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Pre-School Enrollment: An Analysis by Immigrant Generation

Author

Listed:
  • Barry R. Chiswick

    () (Department of Economics, University of Illinois at Chicago)

  • Noyna DebBurman

    (Department of Economics, University of Illinois at Chicago)

Abstract

There has been minimal research on the pre-school enrollment of immigrant children. Using 1990 U.S. Census data, this paper investigates pre-school enrollment of child immigrants, those who immigrated as children and the U.S.-born children of immigrants. The analysis is conducted using probit analysis. Pre-school enrollment is found to vary systematically with parental characteristics (income and education), immigrant generation, number of siblings, mother's labor supply and country of origin. Among the foreign-born, differences in pre-school enrollment are analyzed by country of origin. Among the U.S.-born children of immigrants pre-school enrollment is greatest among those with both parents foreign born.

Suggested Citation

  • Barry R. Chiswick & Noyna DebBurman, 2004. "Pre-School Enrollment: An Analysis by Immigrant Generation," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0404, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:crm:wpaper:0404
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    File URL: http://www.cream-migration.org/publ_uploads/CDP_04_04.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Nicole Schneeweis, 2006. "How should we organize schooling to further children with migration background?," Economics working papers 2006-20, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    2. Gabriela Schütz & Heinrich W. Ursprung & Ludger Wößmann, 2008. "Education Policy and Equality of Opportunity," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(2), pages 279-308, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigrants; Children; School Enrollment; Pre-School;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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