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Mother’s Time Allocation, Child Care and Child Cognitive Development

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  • Brilli, Ylenia

    (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the effects of maternal employment and non-parental child care on child cognitive development, taking into account the mother's time allocation between leisure and child-care time. I estimate a behavioral model, in which maternal labor supply, non-parental child care and time allocation decisions are considered to be endogenous choices of the mother, and the child cognitive development depends on maternal and non-parental child care. The results show that the mother's child-care time is more productive than non-parental child care, at any age of the child. This implies that a reduction in a mother's child-care time, induced by a higher labor supply, may not be compensated for by the increase in non-parental child care use, and, hence, may lead to a negative effect on the child's cognitive ability. The estimation of a counterfactual model where a mother can only allocate her time between child care and work shows that neglecting the mother's time allocation choice between child care and leisure overestimates the productivity of a mother's time with the child.

Suggested Citation

  • Brilli, Ylenia, 2017. "Mother’s Time Allocation, Child Care and Child Cognitive Development," Working Papers in Economics 695, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0695
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/51853
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    Cited by:

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    2. Nicoletti, Cheti & Tonei, Valentina, 2020. "Do parental time investments react to changes in child’s skills and health?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 127(C).
    3. Jorge Rodriguez, 2017. "Understanding the Effects of Income and Child Care Subsidies on Children's Academic Achievement," 2017 Papers pro1077, Job Market Papers.
    4. Daniela Del Boca & Christopher Flinn & Daniela Piazzalunga & Chiara Pronzato & Giuseppe Sorrenti & Matthew Wiswall, 2018. "Childcare Choices and Child Development: a Cross-Country Analysis," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 556, Collegio Carlo Alberto.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    mother employment; mother time allocation; non-parental child care; child development; structural estimation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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