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Intergenerational transmission of education among female immigrants

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  • Susan Niknami

    () (Stockholm University)

Abstract

Abstract This paper uses high-quality register data to perform one of the first descriptions of the patterns of intergenerational transmission of education among immigrant mothers and their daughters. The paper also raises several methodological points related to functional form and measurement error in immigrants’ education. The results show that the degree of intergenerational persistence is lower among immigrants compared to natives, and that the relationship is weaker among those who start out disadvantaged. I find large variations across different immigrant groups, which are partly explained by the first generation’s position in the educational distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Susan Niknami, 2016. "Intergenerational transmission of education among female immigrants," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 715-744, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:14:y:2016:i:3:d:10.1007_s11150-015-9294-9
    DOI: 10.1007/s11150-015-9294-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigrants; Education; Intergenerational transmission;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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