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A Social Network Analysis of Occupational Segregation

Author

Listed:
  • Marco van der Leij

    (University of Alicante)

  • Sebastian Buhai

    (Aarhus University)

Abstract

We develop a social network model of occupational segregation between different social groups, generated by the existence of positive inbreeding bias among individuals from the same group. If network referrals are important in getting a job, then expected inbreeding bias in the contact network structure induces different career choices for individuals from different social groups. This further translates into stable occupational segregation equilibria in the labour market. We derive the conditions for persistent wage and unemployment inequality in the segregation equilibria. Our framework is proposed as complementary to existing theories used to explain labour market inequalities between groups divided by race, ethnicity or gender
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Marco van der Leij & Sebastian Buhai, 2010. "A Social Network Analysis of Occupational Segregation," 2010 Meeting Papers 554, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed010:554
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sergio Currarini & Fernando Vega Redondo, 2010. "Search and Homophily in Social Networks," Working Papers 2010_24, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    2. De Martí, Joan & Zenou, Yves, 2009. "Ethnic Identity and Social Distance in Friendship Formation," CEPR Discussion Papers 7566, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Kahanec, Martin, 2007. "Ethnic Competition and Specialization," IZA Discussion Papers 3167, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Toomet, Ott & Van Der Leij, Marco & Rolfe, Meredith, 2013. "Social networks and labor market inequality between ethnicities and races," Network Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(03), pages 321-352, December.
    5. Nuno Crespo & Nadia Simoes & Sandrina B. Moreira, 2014. "Gender differences in occupational mobility - evidence from Portugal," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(4), pages 460-481, July.
    6. repec:wly:econjl:v:127:y:2017:i:603:p:1279-1317 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. POTHIER, David, 2012. "Referral Networks and the Allocation of Talent," Economics Working Papers ECO2012/18, European University Institute.
    8. Gauer, Florian & Landwehr, Jakob, 2016. "Continuous homophily and clustering in random networks," Center for Mathematical Economics Working Papers 515, Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University.
    9. Balázs Lengyel & Rikard H. Eriksson, 2015. "Co-worker networks and productivity growth in regions," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1513, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised May 2015.
    10. Balázs Lengyel & Rikard H. Eriksson, 2017. "Co-worker networks, labour mobility and productivity growth in regions," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(3), pages 635-660.
    11. Andre Hofmeyr, 2010. "Social Networks And Ethnic Niches: An Econometric Analysis Of The Manufacturing Sector In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 78(1), pages 107-130, March.
    12. Tiago V. V. Cavalcanti & Chryssi Giannitsarou, 2017. "Growth and Human Capital: A Network Approach," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 127(603), pages 1279-1317, August.
    13. Horváth, Gergely, 2014. "Occupational mismatch and social networks," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 442-468.
    14. Pothier, David, 2012. "Referral networks and the allocation of talent," MPRA Paper 39895, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Araujo, Luis & Minetti, Raoul, 2011. "Knowledge sharing and the dynamics of social capital," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(8), pages 1109-1119.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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