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Growth and Human Capital: A Network Approach

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  • Tiago V. V. Cavalcanti
  • Chryssi Giannitsarou

Abstract

We study the interactions and dynamics of human capital, growth and inequality by explicitly embedding networks into a standard endogenous growth model with overlapping generations. The human capital of a household depends on investment in education and on average human capital of the household's network neighborhood. Network structure is crucial for both the long run outcomes and the transition of otherwise identical economies. Network cohesion above a certain threshold eliminates differences across households and leads to long run equality, while below the threshold, inequality is high and persists more often. During transition, (i) high overall growth is achieved when the network has high degree centralization and the most degree central node has high initial human capital and (ii) high individual household growth is achieved when the household has low human capital relative to its neighborhood and is located in a neighborhood that has high average human capital relative to the whole economy.
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  • Tiago V. V. Cavalcanti & Chryssi Giannitsarou, 2017. "Growth and Human Capital: A Network Approach," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 127(603), pages 1279-1317, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:econjl:v:127:y:2017:i:603:p:1279-1317
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/ecoj.2017.127.issue-603
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    Cited by:

    1. Ines Lindner & Holger Strulik, 2020. "Innovation And Inequality In A Small World," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 61(2), pages 683-719, May.
    2. Nikolay Chernyshev, 2018. "From Productivity Shifts to Economic Growth: Intersectoral Linkage as an Amplifying Factor," CDMA Working Paper Series 201801, Centre for Dynamic Macroeconomic Analysis.
    3. Tiago V. V. Cavalcanti & Chryssi Giannitsarou & Charles R. Johnson, 2017. "Network cohesion," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 64(1), pages 1-21, June.
    4. Roger Alejandro Banegas Rivero & Marco Alberto Nuñez Ramirez & Jorge Salas Vargas & Luis Fernando Escobar Caba & Sacnicté Valdez del Río, 2019. "Landlocked Countries, Natural Resources and Growth: The Double Economic Curse Hypothesis," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 9(5), pages 113-124.
    5. Torben Andersen & Joydeep Bhattacharya, 2020. "Intergenerational Debt Dynamics Without Tears," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 35, pages 192-219, January.
    6. Guangyou Zhou & Kuangxiong Gong & Sumei Luo & Guohu Xu, 2018. "Inclusive Finance, Human Capital and Regional Economic Growth in China," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 10(4), pages 1-20, April.
    7. Boucekkine, Raouf & Seegmuller, Thomas & Venditti, Alain, 2021. "Advances in growth and macroeconomic dynamics: In memory of Carine Nourry," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 1-6.
    8. Bosi, Stefano & Lloyd-Braga, Teresa & Nishimura, Kazuo, 2021. "Externalities of human capital," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 145-158.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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