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Aspirations, Segregation, and Occupational Choice

  • Dilip Mookherjee
  • Stefan Napel
  • Debraj Ray

This paper examines the steady states of an overlapping generations economy with a given distribution of household locations over a one-dimensional interval. Parents decide whether or not to educate their children. Educational decisions are affected by location: There are local complementarities in investment incentives stemming from aspirations formation, learning spillovers, or local public goods. At the same time, economy-wide wages endogenously adjust to bring factor supplies into line with demand. The model therefore combines local social interaction with global market interaction. The paper studies steady-state configurations of skill acquisition, both with and without segregation. The model is used to compare macroeconomic and welfare properties of segregated and unsegregated steady states. (JEL: D31, O15, D85) (c) 2010 by the European Economic Association.

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Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Journal of the European Economic Association.

Volume (Year): 8 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (03)
Pages: 139-168

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:jeurec:v:8:y:2010:i:1:p:139-168
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  1. Mookherjee, Dilip & Napel, Stefan, 2007. "Intergenerational mobility and macroeconomic history dependence," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 137(1), pages 49-78, November.
  2. Napel, Stefan & Schneider, Andrea, 2008. "Intergenerational talent transmission, inequality, and social mobility," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 405-409, May.
  3. Christian Ghiglino & Sanjeev Goyal, 2010. "Keeping Up with the Neighbors: Social Interaction in a Market Economy," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 8(1), pages 90-119, 03.
  4. Romans Pancs & Nicolaas J. Vriend, . "Schelling's Spatial Proximity Model of Segregation Revisited," Modeling, Computing, and Mastering Complexity 2003 15, Society for Computational Economics.
  5. Dilip Mookherjee & Stefan Napel & Debraj Ray, 2008. "Aspirations, Segregation and Occupational Choice," Boston University - Department of Economics - The Institute for Economic Development Working Papers Series dp-182, Boston University - Department of Economics.
  6. Galor, Oded & Zeira, Joseph, 1988. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," MPRA Paper 51644, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Sep 1989.
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