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Network Search: Climbing the Job Ladder Faster

Author

Listed:
  • Marcelo Arbex

    () (Department of Economics, University of Windsor)

  • Dennis O'Dea

    () (Department of Economics, University of Washington)

  • David Wiczer

    () (Research Division, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis)

Abstract

We introduce a complex network into a search model in which workers find jobs through their network or directly from firms. This framework links heterogeneity in network position to heterogeneity in wage-employment dynamics: better-connected workers climb the job ladder faster, drawing more frequently from the network offer distribution which stochastically dominates the direct-search distribution. The mean- field approach allows a tractable, recursive formulation and our calibrated version is consistent with several empirical findings. Further, we present new evidence consistent with our model: Job-to-job switches use networks more frequently at higher rungs of the ladder.

Suggested Citation

  • Marcelo Arbex & Dennis O'Dea & David Wiczer, 2016. "Network Search: Climbing the Job Ladder Faster," Working Papers 1606, University of Windsor, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:wis:wpaper:1606
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Giorgio Topa & Aysegul Sahin & Andreas Mueller & Jason Faberman, 2014. "Job Search Behavior among the Employed and Unemployed," 2014 Meeting Papers 975, Society for Economic Dynamics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Giorgio Topa & Aysegul Sahin & Andreas Mueller & Jason Faberman, 2014. "Job Search Behavior among the Employed and Unemployed," 2014 Meeting Papers 975, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Neugart, Michael & Zaharieva, Anna, 2018. "Social Networks, Promotions, and the Glass-Ceiling Effect," Center for Mathematical Economics Working Papers 601, Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University.
    3. Lukas Bolte & Nicole Immorlica & Matthew O. Jackson, 2020. "The Role of Referrals in Immobility, Inequality, and Inefficiency in Labor Markets," Papers 2012.15753, arXiv.org.
    4. Martina Rebien & Michael Stops & Anna Zaharieva, 2020. "Formal Search And Referrals From A Firm'S Perspective," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 61(4), pages 1679-1748, November.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor Markets; Social networks; Job search; Unemployment; Wages dispersion.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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