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Search Capital

Listed author(s):
  • Carrillo-Tudela, Carlos

    ()

    (University of Essex)

  • Smith, Eric

    ()

    (University of Essex)

We construct a simple equilibrium search model in which workers accumulate information about previously met employment contacts. We term the latter search capital. Here search capital (partially) insures workers against adverse shocks. The model provides a theory of job-to-job transitions that are associated with voluntary or involuntary mobility and with wage rises or wage cuts. It also shows why low wage and younger workers are associated with a higher probability of becoming unemployed.

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File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp6366.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 6366.

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Length: 9 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2012
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6366
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  1. Francois Fontaine, 2004. "Why are similar workers paid differently? The role of social networks," 2004 Meeting Papers 493, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Jesper Bagger & Francois Fontaine & Jean-Marc Robin, 2014. "Tenure, experience, human capital and wages: a tractable equilibrium search model of wage dynamics," CeMMAP working papers CWP12/14, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  3. Postel-Vinay, Fabien & Robin, Jean-Marc, 2002. "Equilibrium Wage Dispersion with Worker and Employer Heterogeneity," CEPR Discussion Papers 3548, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Helen Connolly & Peter Gottschalk, 2008. "Wage Cuts as Investment in Future Wage Growth," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(1), pages 1-22, 03.
  5. Audrey Light & Kathleen McGarry, 1998. "Job Change Patterns And The Wages Of Young Men," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(2), pages 276-286, May.
  6. Ronald Wolthoff, 2014. "It'S About Time: Implications Of The Period Length In An Equilibrium Search Model," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 55, pages 839-867, 08.
  7. Calvo-Armengol, Antoni & Jackson, Matthew O., 2007. "Networks in labor markets: Wage and employment dynamics and inequality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 132(1), pages 27-46, January.
  8. Carrillo-Tudela, Carlos & Hobijn, Bart & She, Powen & Visschers, Ludo, 2014. "The extent and cyclicality of career changes: evidence for the U.K," Working Paper Series 2014-21, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  9. Eric J. Bartelsman & Mark Doms, 2000. "Understanding productivity: lessons from longitudinal microdata," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2000-19, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  10. Philipp Kircher, 2009. "Efficiency of simultaneous search," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 29703, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  11. Carrillo-Tudela, Carlos & Menzio, Guido & Smith, Eric, 2009. "Job Search with Bidder Memories," IZA Discussion Papers 4319, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Mortensen, Dale T. & Vishwanath, Tara, 1994. "Personal contacts and earnings : It is who you know!," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(2), pages 187-201, March.
  13. Ludo Visschers & Roberto Pinheiro, 2015. "Unemployment Risk and Wage differentials," 2015 Meeting Papers 936, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  14. Alain Delacroix & Shouyong Shi, 2006. "Directed Search On The Job And The Wage Ladder," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 47(2), pages 651-699, 05.
  15. Harry J. Holzer, 1986. "Search Method Use by Unemployed Youth," NBER Working Papers 1859, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Manolis Galenianos, 2013. "Learning About Match Quality and the Use of Referrals," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(4), pages 668-690, October.
  17. Andreas Hornstein & Per Krusell & Giovanni L. Violante, 2007. "Frictional Wage Dispersion in Search Models: A Quantitative Assessment," NBER Working Papers 13674, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  18. Barbara Petrongolo & Christopher Pissarides, 2000. "Looking into the black box: a survey of the matching function," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2122, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  19. Helen Connolly & Peter Gottschalk, 2002. "Wage Cuts as Investment in Future Wage Growth: Some Evidence," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 543, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 30 Sep 2004.
  20. Calvo-Armengol, Antoni, 2004. "Job contact networks," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 191-206, March.
  21. Leo Kaas & Carlos Carrillo-Tudela, 2015. "Worker Mobility in a Search Model with Adverse Selection," 2015 Meeting Papers 351, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  22. Robert Shimer, 2005. "The Cyclical Behavior of Equilibrium Unemployment and Vacancies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 25-49, March.
  23. Burdett, Kenneth & Mortensen, Dale T, 1998. "Wage Differentials, Employer Size, and Unemployment," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(2), pages 257-273, May.
  24. Diamond, Peter A., 1971. "A model of price adjustment," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 156-168, June.
  25. Topa, Giorgio, 1997. "Social Interactions, Local Spillovers and Unemployment," Working Papers 97-17, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  26. Rasmus Lentz & Dale T. Mortensen, 2005. "Productivity Growth And Worker Reallocation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(3), pages 731-749, 08.
  27. James D. Montgomery, 1991. "Equilibrium Wage Dispersion and Interindustry Wage Differentials," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(1), pages 163-179.
  28. Stewart, Mark, 2006. "The Inter-related Dynamics of Unemployment and Low-Wage Employment," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 741, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  29. Cappellari, Lorenzo & Tatsiramos, Konstantinos, 2011. "Friends’ networks and job finding rates," ISER Working Paper Series 2011-21, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  30. Jolivet, Gregory & Postel-Vinay, Fabien & Robin, Jean-Marc, 2006. "The empirical content of the job search model: Labor mobility and wage distributions in Europe and the US," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 877-907, May.
  31. Curtis R. Taylor, 1995. "The Long Side of the Market and the Short End of the Stick: Bargaining Power and Price Formation in Buyers', Sellers', and Balanced Markets," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(3), pages 837-855.
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