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Social Networks And Ethnic Niches: An Econometric Analysis Of The Manufacturing Sector In South Africa

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  • Andre Hofmeyr

Abstract

This paper analyses the link between social networks and ethnic occupational niches in the manufacturing sector in South Africa. To this end, it employs the methodology of Bertrand "et al." to minimise the omitted variable bias induced by standard approaches investigating network effects and adopts Model's concentration index to define an ethnic niche. The results indicate that 25% of the sample is employed in ethnic niches in the manufacturing sector, but that niche employment varies markedly by language group. In addition, certain language groups tend to be clustered in advantageous niches where monthly income and skill levels are relatively high, while others occupy disadvantageous niches where monthly income and skill levels are relatively low. A number of different econometric specifications find strong evidence of social network effects. This highlights the role that these networks play in forming ethnic niches in the manufacturing sector in South Africa. Copyright (c) 2010 The Author. Journal compilation (c) 2010 Economic Society of South Africa.

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  • Andre Hofmeyr, 2010. "Social Networks And Ethnic Niches: An Econometric Analysis Of The Manufacturing Sector In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 78(1), pages 107-130, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:sajeco:v:78:y:2010:i:1:p:107-130
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. George J. Borjas, 1992. "Ethnic Capital and Intergenerational Mobility," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(1), pages 123-150.
    2. Holzer, Harry J, 1987. "Informal Job Search and Black Youth Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(3), pages 446-452, June.
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    6. Datcher, Linda, 1983. "The Impact of Informal Networks of Quit Behavior," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 65(3), pages 491-495, August.
    7. Buhai, Sebastian & van der Leij, Marco, 2006. "A Social Network Analysis of Occupational Segregation," Working Papers 06-11, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    8. Marcel Fafchamps & Alexander Moradi, 2015. "Referral and Job Performance: Evidence from the Ghana Colonial Army," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63(4), pages 715-751.
    9. Marianne Bertrand & Erzo F. P. Luttmer & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2000. "Network Effects and Welfare Cultures," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(3), pages 1019-1055.
    10. Yannis M. Ioannides & Linda Datcher Loury, 2004. "Job Information Networks, Neighborhood Effects, and Inequality," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1056-1093, December.
    11. Marcel Fafchamps & Alexander Moradi, 2015. "Referral and Job Performance: Evidence from the Ghana Colonial Army," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63(4), pages 715 - 751.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dieter von Fintel, 2016. "Wage flexibility in a high unemployment regime: spatial heterogeneity and the size of local labour markets," Working Papers 09/2016, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    2. PF Blaauw & WF Krugell, 2012. "Micro-evidence on day labourers and the thickness of labour markets in South Africa," Working Papers 282, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    3. KUEPIE Mathias & TENIKUE Michel & WALTHER Olivier, 2014. "Small businesses performance in West African border regions: Do social networks pay off?," LISER Working Paper Series 2014-06, LISER.

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