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Occupational Segregation by Race and Gender, 1958–1981

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  • Randy P. Albelda

Abstract

Studies of occupational segregation by gender reveal little change since 1958. By disaggregating annual data for 1958–81 by race as well as gender, however, the author shows that although white women's occupational distribution has remained stable relative to white men's, nonwhite women's distribution has changed dramatically, particularly relative to white women's. Regression analysis examines structural economic changes, relative educational attainment, and the business cycle as determinants of changes in the occupational distribution over the period 1962–81.

Suggested Citation

  • Randy P. Albelda, 1986. "Occupational Segregation by Race and Gender, 1958–1981," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 39(3), pages 404-411, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:39:y:1986:i:3:p:404-411
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    Cited by:

    1. Gonzalez P. & Watts, M. J., 1996. "Measuring gender wage differentials and job segregation," ILO Working Papers 993139143402676, International Labour Organization.
    2. Branko Milanovic & Paola Salardi, 2016. "The Evolution of Gender and Racial Occupational Segregation Across Formal and Non-Formal Labor Markets in Brazil, 1987 to 2006," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 62, pages 68-89, August.
    3. Buhai, Sebastian & van der Leij, Marco, 2006. "A Social Network Analysis of Occupational Segregation," Working Papers 06-11, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    4. Michael R. Ransom & Aaron Phipps, 2017. "The Changing Occupational Distribution by College Major," Research in Labor Economics,in: Skill Mismatch in Labor Markets, volume 45, pages 129-171 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    5. Barbezat D., 1993. "Occupational segmentation by sex in the world," ILO Working Papers 992989003402676, International Labour Organization.
    6. Olfert, M. Rose & Moebis, Dianne M., 2006. "The Spatial Economy of Gender-Based Occupational Segregation," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 36(1), pages 44-62.
    7. Tüzin Baycan-Levent & Peter Nijkamp, 2011. "Migrant Female Entrepreneurship: Driving Forces, Motivation and Performance," Chapters,in: New Directions in Regional Economic Development, chapter 10 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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