IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bie/wpaper/515.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Continuous homophily and clustering in random networks

Author

Listed:
  • Gauer, Florian

    (Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University)

  • Landwehr, Jakob

    (Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University)

Abstract

We propose a random network model incorporating heterogeneity of agents and a continuous notion of homophily. Unlike the vast majority of the corresponding economic literature, we capture homophily in terms of similarity rather than equality by assuming that the probability of linkage between two agents continuously decreases in the distance of their characteristics. A homophily parameter directly determines the strength of this effect. As a main result, we show that for any positive level of homophily our model exhibits clustering, that is an increased probability of linkage given a common neighbor. As opposed to this, the seminal Bernoulli Random Graph model à la Erdős and Rényi (1959) is comprised as the limit case of no homophily. Moreover, simulations indicate that, although the average distance between agents increases in homophily, the well-known small-world phenomenon is preserved even at high homophily levels. We finally provide a possible application in form of a stylized labor market model, where a firm can hire a new employee via the social network.

Suggested Citation

  • Gauer, Florian & Landwehr, Jakob, 2016. "Continuous homophily and clustering in random networks," Center for Mathematical Economics Working Papers 515, Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University.
  • Handle: RePEc:bie:wpaper:515
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/download/2906000/2906001
    File Function: First Version, 2016
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Calvo-Armengol, Antoni & Jackson, Matthew O., 2007. "Networks in labor markets: Wage and employment dynamics and inequality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 132(1), pages 27-46, January.
    2. Zaharieva, Anna, 2013. "Social welfare and wage inequality in search equilibrium with personal contacts," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 107-121.
    3. Buhai, Sebastian & van der Leij, Marco, 2006. "A Social Network Analysis of Occupational Segregation," Working Papers 06-11, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    4. Montgomery, James D, 1991. "Social Networks and Labor-Market Outcomes: Toward an Economic Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1407-1418, December.
    5. Benjamin Golub & Matthew O. Jackson, 2012. "How Homophily Affects the Speed of Learning and Best-Response Dynamics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 127(3), pages 1287-1338.
    6. Mayer, Adalbert & Puller, Steven L., 2008. "The old boy (and girl) network: Social network formation on university campuses," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1-2), pages 329-347, February.
    7. Stanley Wasserman & Philippa Pattison, 1996. "Logit models and logistic regressions for social networks: I. An introduction to Markov graphs andp," Psychometrika, Springer;The Psychometric Society, vol. 61(3), pages 401-425, September.
    8. Sergio Currarini & Matthew O. Jackson & Paolo Pin, 2009. "An Economic Model of Friendship: Homophily, Minorities, and Segregation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(4), pages 1003-1045, July.
    9. Yannis M. Ioannides & Linda Datcher Loury, 2004. "Job Information Networks, Neighborhood Effects, and Inequality," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1056-1093, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Mihaela van der Schaar & Simpson Zhang, 2015. "From Acquaintances to Friends: Homophily and Learning in Networks," Papers 1510.08103, arXiv.org.
    2. Antinyan, Armenak & Horváth, Gergely & Jia, Mofei, 2019. "Social status competition and the impact of income inequality in evolving social networks: An agent-based model," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 53-69.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Random Graphs; Homophily; Clustering; Small-World Phenomenon; Network Formation; Labor Market Search;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bie:wpaper:515. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Bettina Weingarten). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/imbiede.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.