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Social Welfare and Wage Inequality in Search Equilibrium with Personal Contacts

  • Anna Zaharieva

    ()

    (Institute of Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University)

This paper incorporates job search through personal contacts into an equilibrium matching model with a segregated labour market. Job search in the public submarket is competitive which is in contrast with the bargaining nature of wages in the informal job market. Moreover, the social capital of unemployed workers is endogenous depending on the employment status of their contacts. This paper shows that the traditional Hosios (1990) condition continues to hold in an economy with family contacts but it fails to provide efficiency in an economy with weak ties. This inefficiency is explained by a network externality: weak ties yield higher wages in the informal submarket than family contacts. Furthermore, the spillovers between the two submarkets imply that wage premiums associated with personal contacts lead to higher wages paid to unemployed workers with low social capital but the probability to find a job for those workers is below the optimal level.

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File URL: http://www.imw.uni-bielefeld.de/papers/files/imw-wp-459.pdf
File Function: First version, 2011
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Paper provided by Bielefeld University, Center for Mathematical Economics in its series Working Papers with number 459.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bie:wpaper:459
Contact details of provider: Postal: Postfach 10 01 31, 33501 Bielefeld
Phone: +49(0)521-106-4907
Web page: http://www.imw.uni-bielefeld.de/

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