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The Intergenerational Transmission of Employers

  • Miles Corak
  • Patrizio Piraino

We find that about 40% of a cohort of young Canadian men have beenemployed at some time with an employer for which their father alsoworked, and 6%-9% have the same employer in adulthood. The intergenerationaltransmission of employers is positively related to paternal earnings,particularly at the very top of the earnings distribution, and tothe presence of self-employment income and the number of employerswith which the father has had direct contact. It has an importantinfluence on nonlinear patterns in the intergenerational elasticityof earnings. (c) 2011 by The University of Chicago. Allrights reserved..

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Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 29 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (01)
Pages: 37-68

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:29:y:2010:i:1:p:37-68
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