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El papel de las redes sociales en las oportunidades económicas de las mujeres de Bolivia

  • Dante Contreras
  • Daniela Zapata
  • Diana Kruger
  • Marcelo Ochoa

En este trabajo se analiza el papel de las redes sociales para determinar la participación de mujeres bolivianas en actividades generadoras de ingresos. Los resultados hacen pensar que las redes sociales son un canal eficaz para que las mujeres obtengan acceso a empleos asalariados, los cuales son de mayor calidad que los empleos independientes. Por el contrario, sus contrapartes varones perciben un efecto positivo aunque estadísticamente insignificante en la interacción con redes sociales. Al tomar en cuenta el sexo del contacto, las mujeres de zonas urbanas se benefician de otras mujeres empleadas, mientras en las zonas rurales las mujeres se benefician de la presencia de más trabajadores hombres empleados. (Disponible en Inglés)

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Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department in its series Research Department Publications with number 3241.

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Date of creation: Oct 2007
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Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:3241
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