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Social Networks in Labor Markets

  • Antoni Calvo-Armengol
  • Yannis M. Ioannides

Research in sociology and economics point to important role for social networks in labor markets. Social contacts mediate propagation of rich and reliable information among indi- viduals and thus help workers find jobs and employers find employees. Recent theoretical advances show that for agents connected through networks employment is positively cor- related across time and agents, unemployment exhibits duration dependence, and inequal- ity can persist. Recent empirical findings underscore nonlinearities in social interactions and potentially important effects of self-selection. Socioeconomic characteristics can explain substantial spatial dependence in unemployment.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Tufts University in its series Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University with number 0517.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:tuf:tuftec:0517
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  1. Christopher A. Sims & Jinill Kim & Sunghyun Kim, 2004. "Calculating and Using Second Order Accurate Solution of Discrete Time Dynamic Equilibrium Models," Econometric Society 2004 North American Winter Meetings 411, Econometric Society.
  2. Keely, Louise C. & Tan, Chih Ming, 2008. "Understanding preferences for income redistribution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(5-6), pages 944-961, June.
  3. Jay Shimshack, 2004. "Are Mercury Advisories Effective? Inofrmation, Education, and Fish Consumption," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0423, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  4. Louise C. Keely & Chih Ming Tan, 2005. "Understanding Divergent Views on Redistribution Policy in the United States," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0515, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  5. Jeffrey E. Zabel & Robert W. Paterson, 2006. "The Effects of Critical Habitat Designation on Housing Supply: An Analysis of California Housing Construction Activity," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 67-95.
  6. Henry Kim & Soyoung Kim & Yunjong Wang, 2005. "International Capital Flows and Boom-Bust Cycles in the Asia Pacific Region," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0506, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  7. Roland Hodler & Kurt Schmidheiny, 2005. "How Fiscal Decentralization Flattens Progressive Taxes," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0508, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  8. Henry Kim & Jinill Kim & Robert Kollmann, 2005. "Applying Perturbation Methods to Incomplete Market Models with Exogenous Borrowing Constraints," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0504, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  9. Henry Kim & Soyoung Kim & Yunjong Wang, 2005. "Fear of Floating in East Asia," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0507, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  10. Shimshack, Jay P. & Ward, Michael B. & Beatty, Timothy K.M., 2007. "Mercury advisories: Information, education, and fish consumption," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 158-179, March.
  11. Yannis M. Ioannides, 2005. "Random Graphs and Social Networks: An Economics Perspective," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0518, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  12. Yannis Ioannides & Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, 2005. "Urban Growth," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0513, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  13. Chih Ming Tan, 2005. "No One True Path: Uncovering the Interplay between Geography, Institutions, and Fractionalization in Economic Development," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0512, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  14. Mitchel Y. Abolafia (ed.), 2005. "Markets," Books, Edward Elgar, number 2788, 6.
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