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The Effects of Critical Habitat Designation on Housing Supply: An Analysis of California Housing Construction Activity

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  • Robert W. Paterson
  • Jeffrey E. Zabel

Abstract

Under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is required to designate critical habitat for listed species. Designation could result in modification to or delay of residential development projects within habitat boundaries, generating concern over potential housing market impacts. This paper draws upon a large dataset of municipal-level (FIPS) building permit issuances and critical habitat designations in California over a 13-year period to identify changes in the spatial and temporal pattern of development activity associated with critical habitat designation. We find that the proposal of critical habitat results in a 20.5% decrease in the annual supply of housing permits in the short-run and a 32.6% decrease in the long-run. Further, the percent of the FIPS area that is designated as critical habitat significantly affects the number of permits issued. We also find that the impact varies across the two periods in which critical habitat is designated and by the number of years relative to when critical habitat was first proposed.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert W. Paterson & Jeffrey E. Zabel, 2005. "The Effects of Critical Habitat Designation on Housing Supply: An Analysis of California Housing Construction Activity," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0514, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  • Handle: RePEc:tuf:tuftec:0514
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    1. DiPasquale Denise & Wheaton William C., 1994. "Housing Market Dynamics and the Future of Housing Prices," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 1-27, January.
    2. Mayer, Christopher J. & Somerville, C. Tsuriel, 2000. "Land use regulation and new construction," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 639-662, December.
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    4. Stephen Malpezzi, 1994. "Housing Prices, Externalities, and Regulation in U.S. Metropolitan Areas," Wisconsin-Madison CULER working papers 94-08, University of Wisconsin Center for Urban Land Economic Research.
    5. Mayer, Christopher J. & Somerville, C. Tsuriel, 2000. "Residential Construction: Using the Urban Growth Model to Estimate Housing Supply," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 85-109, July.
    6. John M. Quigley & Steven Raphael, 2005. "Regulation and the High Cost of Housing in California," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 323-328, May.
    7. Brueckner, Jan K., 1987. "The structure of urban equilibria: A unified treatment of the muth-mills model," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics,in: E. S. Mills (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 20, pages 821-845 Elsevier.
    8. Meese, Richard A & Wallace, Nancy E, 1997. "The Construction of Residential Housing Price Indices: A Comparison of Repeat-Sales, Hedonic-Regression and Hybrid Approaches," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 14(1-2), pages 51-73, Jan.-Marc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nelson, Erik J. & Withey, John C. & Pennington, Derric & Lawler, Joshua J., 2017. "Identifying the impacts of critical habitat designation on land cover change," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 89-125.
    2. Kurt Paulsen, 2013. "The Effects of Growth Management on the Spatial Extent of Urban Development, Revisited," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 89(2), pages 193-210.
    3. Bošković, Branko & Nøstbakken, Linda, 2017. "The cost of endangered species protection: Evidence from auctions for natural resources," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 174-192.
    4. Ioannides, Yannis M. & Soetevent, Adriaan R., 2007. "Social networking and individual outcomes beyond the mean field case," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 64(3-4), pages 369-390.
    5. Darlene Chisholm & Margaret McMillan & George Norman, 2010. "Product differentiation and film-programming choice: do first-run movie theatres show the same films?," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 34(2), pages 131-145, May.
    6. Gilbert Metcalf & Jongsang Park, 2007. "A comment on the role of prices for excludable public goods," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 14(6), pages 685-698, December.
    7. Branko Boskovic & Linda Nøstbakken, 2016. "How do Land Markets Anticipate Regulatory Change? Evidence from Canadian Conservation Policy," CESifo Working Paper Series 5956, CESifo Group Munich.
    8. Melstrom, Richard T. & Lee, Kangil & Byl, Jacob P., 2016. "The effect of endangered species regulations on local employment: Evidence from the listing of the lesser prairie chicken," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236254, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    9. Quigley, John M. & Swoboda, Aaron M., 2007. "The urban impacts of the Endangered Species Act: A general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 299-318, March.
    10. Jackson, Kristoffer, 2016. "Do land use regulations stifle residential development? Evidence from California cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 45-56.
    11. Greenstone, Michael & Gayer, Ted, 2009. "Quasi-experimental and experimental approaches to environmental economics," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 21-44, January.
    12. Ralph McLaughlin, 2012. "New housing supply elasticity in Australia: a comparison of dwelling types," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 48(2), pages 595-618, April.
    13. repec:oup:renvpo:v:12:y:2018:i:1:p:69-91. is not listed on IDEAS
    14. repec:eee:eneeco:v:66:y:2017:i:c:p:320-327 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Darlene C. Chisholm & George Norman, 2006. "When to Exit a Product: Evidence from the U. S. Motion-Picture Exhibition Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 57-61, May.
    16. Antoni Calvo-Armengol & Yannis M. Ioannides, 2005. "Social Networks in Labor Markets," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0517, Department of Economics, Tufts University.

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