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Understanding preferences for income redistribution

Listed author(s):
  • Chih Ming Tan
  • Louise C. Keely

Recent research suggests that income redistribution preferences vary across identity groups. We employ a new pattern recognition technology to uncover what these groups are. Using data from the General Social Survey, we present a new stylized fact that preferences for governmental provision of income redistribution vary systematically with race, gender, and class background. We explore the extent to which existing theories of income redistribution can explain our results, but conclude that current approaches do not fully explain the findings

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File URL: http://repec.org/esNASM04/up.32452.1075670138.pdf
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Paper provided by Econometric Society in its series Econometric Society 2004 North American Summer Meetings with number 611.

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Date of creation: 11 Aug 2004
Handle: RePEc:ecm:nasm04:611
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