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The Effects of Religion and Denomination on Earnings and the Returns to Human Capital

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  • Nigel Tomes

Abstract

The effects of religious and denominational background on earnings and the returns to human capital are examined. When religious differences are constrained to be additive, apart from a Jewish differential, there is virtually no evidence that religious or denominational background affects earnings. This contrasts with Greeley's claims of sizable Catholic advantage. In separate earnings regressions we find that the marginal returns to Catholics from college education exceed those to similar Protestants. This offsets the disadvantage of lower precollege returns. Earnings differences between Protestant denominations appear to reflect the sorting of Protestants into denominations according to schooling and income.

Suggested Citation

  • Nigel Tomes, 1984. "The Effects of Religion and Denomination on Earnings and the Returns to Human Capital," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(4), pages 472-488.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:19:y:1984:i:4:p:472-488
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    Cited by:

    1. Cornelissen, Thomas & Jirjahn, Uwe, 2012. "Religion and earnings: Is it good to be an atheist with religious parental background?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 905-908.
    2. Permani, Risti, 2011. "The presence of religious organisations, religious attendance and earnings: Evidence from Indonesia," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 247-258, May.
    3. Sumon Kumar Bhaumik & Manisha Chakrabarty, 2007. "Is Education the Panacea for Economic Deprivation of Muslims? Evidence from Wage Earners in India, 1987-2004," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp858, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    4. Granger, Maury D. & Price, Gregory N., 2007. "The tree of science and original sin: Do christian religious beliefs constrain the supply of scientists?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 144-160, February.
    5. Rupasingha, Anil & Chilton, John b., 2009. "Religious adherence and county economic growth in the US," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 438-450, October.
    6. Edward L. Glaeser & Bruce I. Sacerdote, 2008. "Education and Religion," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, pages 188-215.
    7. Marta Lachowska, 2013. "Employment Relations and Wages: What Can We Learn from Subjective Assessments?," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 13-196, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    8. Lokshin, Michael & Beegle, Kathleen, 2006. "Forgone earnings from smoking : evidence for a developing country," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4018, The World Bank.
    9. Nunziata, Luca & Rocco, Lorenzo, 2014. "The Protestant Ethic and Entrepreneurship: Evidence from Religious Minorities from the Former Holy Roman Empire," MPRA Paper 53566, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Dearmon, Jacob & Grier, Robin, 2011. "Trust and the accumulation of physical and human capital," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 507-519, September.
    11. Ahmed, Salma, 2015. "Dynamics and diversity: How are religious minorities faring in the labour Market in Bangladesh?," MPRA Paper 75153, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 18 Nov 2016.
    12. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2012. "Global financial crisis: dharmic transgressions and solutions," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 39(1), pages 55-80, January.
    13. repec:eee:labchp:v:1:y:1986:i:c:p:693-785 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Keely, Louise C. & Tan, Chih Ming, 2008. "Understanding preferences for income redistribution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 944-961.
    15. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2017. "Religiosity and Labour Earnings in Canadian Provinces," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 82-99, March.
    16. Bhaumik, Sumon Kumar & Chakrabarty, Manisha, 2009. "Is education the panacea for economic deprivation of Muslims?: Evidence from wage earners in India, 1987-2005," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, pages 137-149.
    17. Sander, William, 2010. "Religious background and educational attainment: The effects of Buddhism, Islam, and Judaism," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 489-493, June.
    18. Sri Ranjith & Anil Rupasingha, 2012. "Social and Cultural Determinants of Child Poverty in the United States," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(1), pages 119-142.
    19. Johan Fourie & Jaume Rosselló & Maria Santana-Gallego, 2015. "Religion, Religious Diversity and Tourism," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(1), pages 51-64, February.
    20. Bettendorf, L. & Dijkgraaf, E., 2010. "Religion and income: Heterogeneity between countries," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 74(1-2), pages 12-29, May.
    21. Edward L. Glaeser & Bruce I. Sacerdote, 2008. "Education and Religion," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, pages 188-215.

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