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How Robust Are the Linkages Between Religiosity and Economic Growth

  • Steven N. Durlauf
  • Andros Kourtellos
  • Chih Ming Tan

Do variations in the degree of religiosity across countries translate into predictable differences in cross-country growth experiences? We apply a model averaging procedure to investigate the empirical robustness of linkages between religiosity and growth when other fundamental growth determinants, such as institutions, fractionalization, and geography, are simultaneously considered. Our results suggest that while religiosity variables such as belief in hell, belief in heaven, and monthly church attendance are potentially relevant to growth there is no evidence to suggest that they are either quantitatively significant or important.

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File URL: http://ase.tufts.edu/econ/papers/200510.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Tufts University in its series Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University with number 0510.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:tuf:tuftec:0510
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