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The Sources of Long-term Economic Growth for Turkey, 1880-2005

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  • Altug, Sumru G.
  • Filiztekin, Alpay
  • Pamuk, Sevket

Abstract

This paper considers the sources of long-term economic growth for Turkey over the period 1880-2005. The period in question covers the decline and eventual dissolution of the former Ottoman Empire and the emergence of the new Turkish Republic in 1923. Hence, the paper provides a unique look at the growth experience of these two different political and economic regimes. The paper examines in detail the evolution of factors that led to growth in output across broad periods, including the post WWII period and the era or globalization beginning in the 1980's. It also considers output growth in the agricultural and non-agricultural sectors separately and allows for the effects of sectoral re-allocation. The lessons from this exercise have important implications for Turkey's future economic performance, for its ability to converge to per capita income levels of developed countries, and for the viability of its current bid for European Union membership.

Suggested Citation

  • Altug, Sumru G. & Filiztekin, Alpay & Pamuk, Sevket, 2007. "The Sources of Long-term Economic Growth for Turkey, 1880-2005," CEPR Discussion Papers 6463, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:6463
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Meltem İNCE YENİLMEZ, 2017. "What Determines Labour Movement from Turkey to Europe? Extent of the Situation and Implications," Sosyoekonomi Journal, Sosyoekonomi Society, issue 25.
    2. Mihai Macovei, 2009. "Growth and economic crises in Turkey: leaving behind a turbulent past?," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 386, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    3. Prados de la Escosura, Leandro & Rosés, Joan R., 2008. "Proximate causes of economic growth in Spain, 1850-2000," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH wp08-12, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    4. Luca, Davide, 2016. "Votes and Regional Economic Growth: Evidence from Turkey," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 477-495.
    5. Erol Taymaz & Ebru Voyvoda & Kamil Yilmaz, 2008. "Turkiye Imalat Sanayiinde Yapisal Dönüsüm ve Teknolojik Degisme Dinamikleri," ERC Working Papers 0804, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Jun 2008.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    determinants of growth; growth accounting; sectoral re-allocation;

    JEL classification:

    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General
    • N15 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Asia including Middle East
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O50 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - General
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries

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