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Relative Stagnation alla Turca

Author

Listed:
  • Tasso Adamopoulos
  • Ahmet Akyol

    () (Economics York University)

Abstract

Turkey is the only founding member of the OECD that has not converged to the US in terms of per-capita GDP since 1950: its real GDP per capita is stuck at 20% of that of the US. At a proximate level, we show that Turkey's relative stagnation over the past 50 years is due to: (1) the relative decline in its labor force participation, and (2) the relative stagnation of its TFP. We argue that the first fact is due to policies of high personal income taxation, and high social security contributions for both employees and employers. The second fact we argue is due to price support policies in agriculture, which distorted the allocation of resources in favor of agriculture, thereby delayed the process of the structural transformation. We develop a dynamic general equilibrium model with agricultural and non-agricultural sectors. The production of the non-agricultural good can take place in the market or the household sector. We show the extent to which these policies can account quantitatively for Turkey's relative stagnation

Suggested Citation

  • Tasso Adamopoulos & Ahmet Akyol, 2006. "Relative Stagnation alla Turca," 2006 Meeting Papers 703, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed006:703
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Attar, M. Aykut, 2016. "Economic Growth and Technological Progress in Turkey: An Analysis of Schumpeterian Mechanisms," MPRA Paper 73255, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Bahadir, Berrak & Gumus, Inci, 2016. "Credit decomposition and business cycles in emerging market economies," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 250-262.
    3. Margarida Duarte & Diego Restuccia, 2010. "The Role of the Structural Transformation in Aggregate Productivity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(1), pages 129-173.
    4. Hehe Liu & Tianyu Yang, 2015. "Explaining the Productivity Growth Gap Between China and India: The Role of Structural Transformation," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 53(2), pages 100-121, June.
    5. Murat Üngör, 2016. "Did the rising importance of services decelerate overall productivity improvement of Turkey during 2002–2007?," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 238-261, July.
    6. Üngör, Murat, 2014. "Some thought experiments on the changes in labor supply in Turkey," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 265-272.
    7. Idil Göksel, 2012. "The Reasons Of Decreasing Trend Of Female Labour Force Participation In Turkey: The Role Of Conservatism," Working Papers 1205, Izmir University of Economics.
    8. Bah El-hadj, 2013. "Distortions, structural transformation and the Europe-US income gap," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 13(1), pages 1-34, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Relative Stagnation; Labor Force Participation; Income Taxes;

    JEL classification:

    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe

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