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The aggregate impact of micro distortions: complementarities matter

Listed author(s):
  • Norman V. Loayza

    (The World Bank)

  • Facundo Piguillem

    (EIEF)

  • Raphael Bergoeing

    (University of Chile)

We explore how developmental and regulatory impediments to resource reallocation limit the ability of developing countries to adopt technologies: an efficient economy quickly innovates; but when the economy is unable to fully use resources liberated by closing firms, or when policy distortions deter firm dynamics, then technological adoption becomes sluggish, and growth is reduced. Our theory accounts for 75% of the income gap between Latin America and the U.S. Half of this simulated gap is explained by the barriers individually, the other half by their complementarity. Thus, the benefits from market reforms are largely diminished if distortions, developmental as well as regulatory, are not uniformly eliminated

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File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2010/paper_1132.pdf
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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2010 Meeting Papers with number 1132.

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Date of creation: 2010
Handle: RePEc:red:sed010:1132
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Society for Economic Dynamics Marina Azzimonti Department of Economics Stonybrook University 10 Nicolls Road Stonybrook NY 11790 USA

Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/
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  1. Edward C. Prescott, 2004. "Why do Americans work so much more than Europeans?," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Jul, pages 2-13.
  2. Barro, Robert J & Lee, Jong-Wha, 2001. "International Data on Educational Attainment: Updates and Implications," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 541-563, July.
  3. Douglas Gollin, 2002. "Getting Income Shares Right," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(2), pages 458-474, April.
  4. Gust, Christopher & Marquez, Jaime, 2004. "International comparisons of productivity growth: the role of information technology and regulatory practices," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 33-58, February.
  5. Samaniego, Roberto M., 2006. "Industrial subsidies and technology adoption in general equilibrium," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 30(9-10), pages 1589-1614.
  6. Richard Rogerson, 2007. "Taxation and market work: is Scandinavia an outlier?," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 32(1), pages 59-85, July.
  7. Hopenhayn, Hugo & Rogerson, Richard, 1993. "Job Turnover and Policy Evaluation: A General Equilibrium Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(5), pages 915-938, October.
  8. Hopenhayn, Hugo A, 1992. "Entry, Exit, and Firm Dynamics in Long Run Equilibrium," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(5), pages 1127-1150, September.
  9. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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