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Is external debt an effective way of bringing economic reforms?

  • Gul, Adnan
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    This paper investigates the adverse effects of external debt on economic performance. In order to cater the issue of errors in mathematical model developed to analyze the correlation, this paper deals by performing a hypothetical analysis on economic growth within a country at different levels of external debt. The analysis is done on all sectors at the same time to ensure maximum accuracy. The paper concludes that debt itself is not an effective way of helping underdeveloped countries. This study adds in finding effective means which will allow underdeveloped countries to get a foothold on the development ladder of economy.

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/10979/1/MPRA_paper_10979.pdf
    File Function: original version
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    Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 10979.

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    Date of creation: 10 Sep 2008
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    Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:10979
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    1. Richard Breen, 1999. "Income Inequality and Macroeconomic Volatility: An Empirical Investigation," Economics Series Working Papers 1999-W20, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
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    6. Richard Blundell & Steve Bond & Frank Windmeijer, 2000. "Estimation in dynamic panel data models: improving on the performance of the standard GMM estimator," IFS Working Papers W00/12, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    7. Jonathan Temple, 1999. "The New Growth Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 112-156, March.
    8. Bond, Steve & Asli, Leblebicioglu & Schiantarelli, Fabio, 2004. "Capital Accumulation and Growth: A New Look at the Empirical Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 1174, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Cohen, Daniel, 1997. "Growth and External Debt: A New Perspective on the African and Latin American Tragedies," CEPR Discussion Papers 1753, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Arellano, Manuel & Bond, Stephen, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 277-97, April.
    11. Imbs, Jean & Ranciere, Romain, 2006. "The Overhang Hangover," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 0604, CEPREMAP.
    12. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
    13. Breen, R. & Garcia-Penalosa, C., 1999. "Income Inequality and Macroeconomic Volatility: an Empirical Investigation," G.R.E.Q.A.M. 99b11, Universite Aix-Marseille III.
    14. Judson, Ruth A. & Owen, Ann L., 1999. "Estimating dynamic panel data models: a guide for macroeconomists," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 9-15, October.
    15. Paul R. Krugman, 1988. "Financing vs. Forgiving a Debt Overhang," NBER Working Papers 2486, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Erwin Tiongson & Hamid Reza Davoodi & Sawitree S. Asawanuchit, 2003. "How Useful Are Benefit Incidence Analyses of Public Education and Health Spending," IMF Working Papers 03/227, International Monetary Fund.
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    18. Hélène Poirson & Luca Antonio Ricci & Catherine A. Pattillo, 2002. "External Debt and Growth," IMF Working Papers 02/69, International Monetary Fund.
    19. Aart Kraay & Vikram Nehru, 2006. "When Is External Debt Sustainable?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 20(3), pages 341-365.
    20. William R. Cline, 1995. "International Debt Reexamined," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 46.
    21. Stephen Bond & Anke Hoeffler & Jonathan Temple, 2001. "GMM Estimation of Empirical Growth Models," Economics Papers 2001-W21, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    22. Claessens, Stijn & Detragiache, Enrica & Kanbur, Ravi & Wickham, Peter, 1996. "Analytical aspects of the debt problems of heavily indebted poor countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1618, The World Bank.
    23. Kneller, Richard & Bleaney, Michael F. & Gemmell, Norman, 1999. "Fiscal policy and growth: evidence from OECD countries," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 171-190, November.
    24. Asiedu, Elizabeth, 2003. "Debt relief and institutional reform: a focus on Heavily Indebted Poor Countries," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 614-626.
    25. Gupta, Sanjeev & Clements, Benedict & Baldacci, Emanuele & Mulas-Granados, Carlos, 2005. "Fiscal policy, expenditure composition, and growth in low-income countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 441-463, April.
    26. Serven, Luis, 1997. "Irreversibility, Uncertainty and Private Investment: Analytical Issues and Some Lessons for Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 6(3), pages 229-68, Supplemen.
    27. International Monetary Fund, 2002. "Financial Crises, Poverty, and Income Distribution," IMF Working Papers 02/4, International Monetary Fund.
    28. Grün, Carola & Klasen, Stephan, 2000. "Growth, Income Distribution, And well-Being In Transition Countries," Discussion Papers in Economics 26, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
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