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Moving Forward in African Economic History. Bridging the Gap Between Methods and Sources

Author

Listed:
  • Jerven, Morten

    (School for International Studies, Simon Fraser University)

  • Austin, Gareth

    (Department of International History, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva)

  • Green, Erik

    (Department of Economic History, Lund University)

  • Uche, Chibuike

    (Department of Banking and Finance, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus)

  • Frankema, Ewout

    (Department of Social and Economic History, Utrecht University)

  • Fourie, Johan

    (Department of Economics, Stellenbosch University)

  • Inikori, Joseph

    (Department of History, University of Rochester)

  • Moradi, Alexander

    (Department of Economics, University of Sussex)

  • Hillbom, Ellen

    (Department of Economic History, Lund University)

Abstract

The field of African economic history is in resurgence. This paper reviews recent and on-going research contributions and notes strengths in their wide methodological, conceptual and topical variety. In these strengths there is also a challenge: different methodological approaches may also result in divisions, particularly on the quantitative versus qualitative axis. The African Economic History Network has recently been formed to bridge the gap between methods and sources and to facilitate intellectual exchanges among the widest possible range of scholars working on Sub-Saharan economic history. This paper outlines current research projects and calls for future research as well as suggesting promising lines of enquiry in the discipline.

Suggested Citation

  • Jerven, Morten & Austin, Gareth & Green, Erik & Uche, Chibuike & Frankema, Ewout & Fourie, Johan & Inikori, Joseph & Moradi, Alexander & Hillbom, Ellen, 2012. "Moving Forward in African Economic History. Bridging the Gap Between Methods and Sources," Lund Papers in Economic History 124, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:luekhi:0124
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    Cited by:

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    3. van den Boogaard, Vanessa & Prichard, Wilson & Milicic, Nikola & Benson, Matthew, 2016. "Tax Revenue Mobilization in Conflict-Affected Developing Countries," Working Papers 13551, Institute of Development Studies, International Centre for Tax and Development.
    4. Andersson, Jens & Andersson, Martin, 2019. "Beyond Miracle and Malaise: Social Capability in Côte d’Ivoire and Senegal during the Development Era 1930-1980," Lund Papers in Economic History 202, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    5. Vanessa van den Boogaard & Wilson Prichard & Nikola Milicic & Matthew Benson, 2016. "Tax revenue mobilization in conflict-affected developing countries," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2016-155, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Gabriele Cappelli & Jörg Baten, 2017. "European Trade, Colonialism and Human Capital Accumulation in Senegal, Gambia and Western Mali, 1770 - 1900," CESifo Working Paper Series 6468, CESifo.
    7. Morten Jerven, 2014. "A West African experiment: constructing a GDP series for colonial Ghana, 1891–1950," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(4), pages 964-992, November.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Africa; economic history; methods; sources; quantitative; qualitative;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • N01 - Economic History - - General - - - Development of the Discipline: Historiographical; Sources and Methods
    • N17 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N27 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N37 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N57 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N67 - Economic History - - Manufacturing and Construction - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N77 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N87 - Economic History - - Micro-Business History - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N97 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - Africa; Oceania

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