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Introduction: the renaissance of African economic history

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  • Austin, Gareth
  • Broadberry, Stephen

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  • Austin, Gareth & Broadberry, Stephen, 2014. "Introduction: the renaissance of African economic history," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60005, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:60005
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    5. Gareth Austin & Joerg Baten & Bas Van Leeuwen, 2012. "The biological standard of living in early nineteenth-century West Africa: new anthropometric evidence for northern Ghana and Burkina Faso," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 65(4), pages 1280-1302, November.
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    11. Frankema, Ewout & Waijenburg, Marlous Van, 2012. "Structural Impediments to African Growth? New Evidence from Real Wages in British Africa, 1880–1965," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 72(4), pages 895-926, December.
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    15. Francis Teal, 2002. "Export Growth and Trade Policy in Ghana in the Twentieth Century," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(9), pages 1319-1337, September.
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    19. Broadberry, Stephen & Gardner, Leigh, 2014. "African economic growth in a European mirror: a historical perspective," Economic History Working Papers 56493, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    20. Decker, Stephanie, 2007. "Corporate Legitimacy and Advertising: British Companies and the Rhetoric of Development in West Africa, 1950–1970," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 81(1), pages 59-86, April.
    21. E. W. Evans & David Richardson, 1995. "Hunting for rents: the economics of slaving in pre-colonial Africa," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 48(4), pages 665-686, November.
    22. Hopkins, Antony G., 1986. "The world bank in Africa: Historical reflections on the African present," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 14(12), pages 1473-1487, December.
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    24. Inikori, Joseph E., 2007. "Africa and the globalization process: western Africa, 1450–1850," Journal of Global History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(1), pages 63-86, March.
    25. Frankema, Ewout, 2010. "Raising revenue in the British empire, 1870–1940: how ‘extractive’ were colonial taxes?," Journal of Global History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(3), pages 447-477, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Giovanni Federico & Antonio Tena‐Junguito, 2017. "Lewis revisited: tropical polities competing on the world market, 1830–1938," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 70(4), pages 1244-1267, November.
    2. Sédi-Anne Boukaka & Giulia Mancini & Giovanni Vecchi, 2021. "Poverty and inequality in Francophone Africa, 1960s–2010s," Economic History of Developing Regions, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(1), pages 1-29, January.
    3. Johan Fourie, 2019. "Who Writes African Economic History?," Economic History of Developing Regions, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(2), pages 111-131, May.
    4. Denis Cogneau, 2016. "History, Data and Economics for Africa: Can We Get Them Less Wrong?: Reply to Morten Jerven's ‘Trapped between tragedies and miracles: Misunderstanding African economic growth’," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 34(6), pages 895-899, November.
    5. Aman, Moustapha & Nenovsky, Nikolay, 2014. "Géopolitique du régime monétaire. Expliquer la longévité du Currency Board de Djibouti [Geopolitics of Monetaray Regime. Expaning the longevity of Currency Board in Djibouti]," MPRA Paper 80089, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2016.
    6. Broadberry, Stephen & Gardner, Leigh, 2019. "Economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa, 1885-2008," Economic History Working Papers 100473, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    7. Ewout Frankema & Jeffrey Williamson & Pieter Woltjer, 2015. "An Economic Rationale for the African Scramble: The Commercial Transition and the Commodity Price Boom of 1845-1885," NBER Working Papers 21213, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Stephen Broadberry & Leigh Gardner, 2019. "Economic Growth In Sub-Saharan Africa, 1885-2008," Oxford Economic and Social History Working Papers _169, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    9. AMAN, Moustapha, 2018. "Les sphères d’influence dans les régimes monétaires : l’expérience de la Corne de l’Afrique (1860-1950) [Spheres of influence in monetary regimes: the experience of the Horn of Africa (1860-1950)]," MPRA Paper 98815, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Michiel De Haas & Ewout Frankema, 2018. "Gender, ethnicity, and unequal opportunity in colonial Uganda: European influences, African realities, and the pitfalls of parish register data," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(3), pages 965-994, August.
    11. Martina Cioni & Giovanni Federico & Michelangelo Vasta, 2020. "The long-term evolution of economic history: evidence from the top five field journals (1927–2017)," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 14(1), pages 1-39, January.

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