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History, Data and Economics for Africa: Can We Get Them Less Wrong?: Reply to Morten Jerven's ‘Trapped between tragedies and miracles: Misunderstanding African economic growth’

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  • Denis Cogneau

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  • Denis Cogneau, 2016. "History, Data and Economics for Africa: Can We Get Them Less Wrong?: Reply to Morten Jerven's ‘Trapped between tragedies and miracles: Misunderstanding African economic growth’," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 34(6), pages 895-899, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:devpol:v:34:y:2016:i:6:p:895-899
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2010. "The Credibility Revolution in Empirical Economics: How Better Research Design Is Taking the Con out of Econometrics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(2), pages 3-30, Spring.
    2. Denis Cogneau & Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Gilles Spielvogel, 2015. "Development at the Border: Policies and National Integration in Côte D'Ivoire and Its Neighbors," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 29(1), pages 41-71.
    3. Thomas Bossuroy & Denis Cogneau, 2013. "Social Mobility in Five African Countries," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 59, pages 84-110, October.
    4. repec:dau:papers:123456789/12594 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Justin Sandefur & Amanda Glassman, 2015. "The Political Economy of Bad Data: Evidence from African Survey and Administrative Statistics," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(2), pages 116-132, February.
    6. Lamoreaux, Naomi, 2015. "The Future of Economic History Must Be Interdisciplinary," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 75(04), pages 1251-1257, December.
    7. Denis Cogneau & Yannick Dupraz, 2014. "Questionable Inference on the Power of Pre-Colonial Institutions in Africa," Working Papers halshs-01018548, HAL.
    8. Denis Cogneau & Yannick Dupraz, 2014. "Questionable Inference on the Power of Pre-Colonial Institutions in Africa," PSE Working Papers halshs-01018548, HAL.
    9. Gareth Austin & Stephen Broadberry, 2014. "Introduction: The renaissance of African economic history," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(4), pages 893-906, November.
    10. Denis Cogneau & Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Gilles Spielvogel, 2015. "Development at the Border: Policies and National Integration in Côte D'Ivoire and Its Neighbors," Post-Print halshs-01112517, HAL.
    11. Ravallion, Martin, 2016. "The Economics of Poverty: History, Measurement, and Policy," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780190212773.
    12. Gareth Austin, 2015. "African Economic History in Africa," Economic History of Developing Regions, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(1), pages 79-94, June.
    13. Edward E. Leamer, 2010. "Tantalus on the Road to Asymptopia," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(2), pages 31-46, Spring.
    14. repec:dau:papers:123456789/12067 is not listed on IDEAS
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