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Borders that Divide: Education and Religion in Ghana and Togo since Colonial Times

Author

Listed:
  • Cogneau, Denis

    () (Paris School of Economics)

  • Moradi, Alexander

    () (Economics department, University of Sussex)

Abstract

The partition of German Togoland after WWI provides a natural experiment allowing to test what impact colonial policies really had. Using a data set of recruits to the Ghana colonial army 1908-1955, we find literacy and religious beliefs to diverge at the border between British and French mandated part of Togoland as early as in the 1920s. We attribute this to the different policies towards missionary schools. The divergence is only visible in the South where educational and evangelization efforts were strong enough. Using contemporary survey data we find that border effects originated at colonial times still persist today.

Suggested Citation

  • Cogneau, Denis & Moradi, Alexander, 2013. "Borders that Divide: Education and Religion in Ghana and Togo since Colonial Times," African Economic History Working Paper 4/2012, African Economic History Network.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:afekhi:2012_004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ewout H.P. Frankema, 2012. "The origins of formal education in sub-Saharan Africa: was British rule more benign?," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(4), pages 335-355, November.
    2. Moradi, Alexander, 2009. "Towards an Objective Account of Nutrition and Health in Colonial Kenya: A Study of Stature in African Army Recruits and Civilians, 1880–1980," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 69(03), pages 719-754, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Africa; German Togoland; colonial policies; missionary schools;

    JEL classification:

    • N37 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N97 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - Africa; Oceania

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