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Is Traditional Teaching really all that Bad? A Within-Student Between-Subject Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Guido Schwerdt
  • Amelie C. Wuppermann

Abstract

Recent studies conclude that teachers are important for student learning but it remains uncertain what actually determines effective teaching. This study directly peers into the black box of educational production by investigating the relationship between lecture style teaching and student achievement. Based on matched student-teacher data for the US, the estimation strategy exploits between-subject variation to control for unobserved student traits. Results indicate that traditional lecture style teaching is associated with significantly higher student achievement. No support for detrimental effects of lecture style teaching can be found even when evaluating possible selection biases due to unobservable teacher characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Guido Schwerdt & Amelie C. Wuppermann, 2009. "Is Traditional Teaching really all that Bad? A Within-Student Between-Subject Approach," CESifo Working Paper Series 2634, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_2634
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    teaching practices; educational production; TIMSS; between-subject variation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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