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Testing for Panel Cointegration Using Common Correlated Effects

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  • Anindya Banerjee
  • Josep Lluis Carrion-i-Silvestre

Abstract

Spurious regression analysis in panel data when time series are cross-section dependent is analyzed in the paper. We show that consistent estimation of the long-run average parameter is possible once we control for cross-section dependence using cross-section averages in the spirit of the common correlated effects approach in Pesaran (2006), Holly, Pesaran and Yamagata (2010) and Kapetanios, Pesaran and Yamagata (2011). This result is used to design a panel cointegration test statistic. The performance of the proposal is investigated in comparison with factor-based methods to control for dependence when both strong and weak cross-section dependence may be present.

Suggested Citation

  • Anindya Banerjee & Josep Lluis Carrion-i-Silvestre, 2011. "Testing for Panel Cointegration Using Common Correlated Effects," Discussion Papers 11-16, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
  • Handle: RePEc:bir:birmec:11-16
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. M. Hashem Pesaran, 2006. "Estimation and Inference in Large Heterogeneous Panels with a Multifactor Error Structure," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(4), pages 967-1012, July.
    2. Peter C. B. Phillips & Hyungsik R. Moon, 1999. "Linear Regression Limit Theory for Nonstationary Panel Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(5), pages 1057-1112, September.
    3. Kapetanios, G. & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Yamagata, T., 2011. "Panels with non-stationary multifactor error structures," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 160(2), pages 326-348, February.
    4. Holly, Sean & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Yamagata, Takashi, 2010. "A spatio-temporal model of house prices in the USA," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 158(1), pages 160-173, September.
    5. Banerjee, Anindya & Carrion-i-Silvestre, Josep Lluís, 2006. "Cointegration in panel data with breaks and cross-section dependence," Working Paper Series 591, European Central Bank.
    6. Georges Bresson & Badi H. Baltagi & Alain Pirotte, 2007. "Panel unit root tests and spatial dependence," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(2), pages 339-360.
    7. Jushan Bai & Serena Ng, 2004. "A PANIC Attack on Unit Roots and Cointegration," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(4), pages 1127-1177, July.
    8. M. Hashem Pesaran, 2007. "A simple panel unit root test in the presence of cross-section dependence," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(2), pages 265-312.
    9. Pesaran, M.H., 2004. "‘General Diagnostic Tests for Cross Section Dependence in Panels’," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0435, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    10. Alexander Chudik & M. Hashem Pesaran & Elisa Tosetti, 2011. "Weak and strong cross‐section dependence and estimation of large panels," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 14(1), pages 45-90, February.
    11. Markus Eberhardt & Anindya Banerjee and J. James Reade, 2010. "Panel Estimation for Worriers," Economics Series Working Papers 514, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    12. Peter Phillips & Hyungsik Moon, 2000. "Nonstationary panel data analysis: an overview of some recent developments," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 263-286.
    13. Phillips, P.C.B., 1986. "Understanding spurious regressions in econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 311-340, December.
    14. Granger, C. W. J. & Newbold, P., 1974. "Spurious regressions in econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 111-120, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eberhardt, Markus & Presbitero, Andrea F., 2015. "Public debt and growth: Heterogeneity and non-linearity," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(1), pages 45-58.
    2. Exenberger, Andreas & Pondorfer, Andreas & Wolters, Maik H., 2014. "Estimating the impact of climate change on agricultural production: Accounting for technology heterogeneity across countries," Kiel Working Papers 1920, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    3. Gerdie Everaert & Freddy Heylen & Ruben Schoonackers, 2015. "Fiscal policy and TFP in the OECD: measuring direct and indirect effects," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 605-640, September.
    4. Ricardo Bebczuk & Tamara Burdisso & Máximo Sangiácomo, 2012. "Credit vs. Payment Services: Financial Development and Economic Activity Revisited," BCRA Working Paper Series 201256, Central Bank of Argentina, Economic Research Department.
    5. repec:spr:lsprsc:v:10:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s12076-017-0192-z is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Mercy Laita Palamuleni, 2017. "The Unemployment Invariant Hypothesis: Heterogenous Panel Cointegration Evidence From U.S. State Level Data," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 7(1), pages 414-419.
    7. repec:spr:lsprsc:v:10:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s12076-017-0190-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Bonizzi, Bruno, 2017. "Institutional investors’ allocation to emerging markets: A panel approach to asset demand," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 47-64.
    9. Brantley Liddle, 2013. "The Energy, Economic Growth, Urbanization Nexus Across Development: Evidence from Heterogeneous Panel Estimates Robust to Cross-Sectional Dependence," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    10. Markus Eberhardt & Francis Teal, 2013. "No Mangoes in the Tundra: Spatial Heterogeneity in Agricultural Productivity Analysis," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 75(6), pages 914-939, December.
    11. Omay, Tolga & Yuksel, Asli & Yuksel, Aydin, 2015. "An empirical examination of the generalized Fisher effect using cross-sectional correlation robust tests for panel cointegration," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 18-29.
    12. Michael Beenstock & Daniel Felsenstein & Ziv Rubin, 2015. "Visa waivers, multilateral resistance and international tourism: some evidence from Israel," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 357-371, November.
    13. Tolga Omay & Mubariz Hasanov & Asli Yuksel & Aydin Yuksel, 2016. "A Note on the Examination of the Fisher Hypothesis by Using Panel Co-Integration Tests with Break," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(2), pages 13-26, June.
    14. Baltagi, Badi H. & Feng, Qu & Kao, Chihwa, 2016. "Estimation of heterogeneous panels with structural breaks," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 191(1), pages 176-195.
    15. Felipa de Mello-Sampayo & Sofia de Sousa-Vale, 2014. "Financing Health Care Expenditure in the OECD Countries: Evidence from a Heterogeneous, Cross-Sectional Dependent Panel," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 61(2), pages 207-225, March.
    16. Gengenbach, Christian & Urbain, Jean-Pierre & Westerlund, Joakim, 2013. "Alternative representations for cointegrated panels with global stochastic trends," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(3), pages 485-488.
    17. Beenstock, Michael & Felsenstein, Daniel, 2015. "Estimating spatial spillover in housing construction with nonstationary panel data," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 42-58.
    18. Herzer, Dierk, 2014. "The long-run relationship between trade and population health: evidence from five decades," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100441, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    19. repec:bla:worlde:v:40:y:2017:i:2:p:462-487 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Tamara Burdisso & Máximo Sangiácomo, 2016. "Panel times series. A review of methodological developments," Ensayos Económicos, Central Bank of Argentina, Economic Research Department, vol. 1(74), pages 105-131, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Panel cointegration; cross-section dependence; common factors; spatial econometrics;

    JEL classification:

    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General
    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes

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