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Forward Guidance Matters: disentangling monetary policy shocks

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  • Leonardo N. Ferreira

Abstract

Central banks have usually employed short-term rates as the main instrument of monetary policy. In the last decades, however, forward guidance has also become a central tool for monetary policy. In an innovative way this paper combines two sources of extraneous information –high frequency surprises and narrative evidence – with sign restrictions in a structural vector autoregressive (VAR) model to fully disentangle the effects of forward guidance shocks from the effects of conventional monetary policy shocks. Results show that conventional monetary policy has the expected effects even in a recent US sample, in contrast with the evidence reported by Barakchian and Crowe (2013) and Ramey (2016), and that forward guidance is an effective policy tool. In fact, it is at least as strong as conventional monetary policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Leonardo N. Ferreira, 2020. "Forward Guidance Matters: disentangling monetary policy shocks," Working Papers Series 530, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:bcb:wpaper:530
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    Cited by:

    1. Kaminska, Iryna & Mumtaz, Haroon & Sustek, Roman, 2021. "Monetary policy surprises and their transmission through term premia and expected interest rates," Bank of England working papers 914, Bank of England, revised 28 Apr 2021.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C50 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - General

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