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Alberto Paolo Martini

Personal Details

First Name:Alberto
Middle Name:Paolo
Last Name:Martini
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma537
Dipartimento POLIS Facoltà di Scienze Politiche Università del Piemonte Orientale via Cavour, 50 Alessandria Italy

Affiliation

Dipartimento di Politiche Pubbliche e Scelte Collettive (POLIS)
Università del Piemonte Orientale "Amedeo Avogadro"

Alessandria, Italy
http://polis.unipmn.it/

:


RePEc:edi:dppmnit (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Sheena McConnell & Peter Schochet & Alberto Martini, 2011. "Neither Easy Nor Cheap," Mathematica Policy Research Reports c02bd40308bf425dae1e9cd95, Mathematica Policy Research.
  2. Mo Costabella, Luca & Martini, Alberto, 2007. "Valutare gli effetti indesiderati dell'istituto della mobilitàsul comportamento delle impresee dei lavoratori," POLIS Working Papers 78, Institute of Public Policy and Public Choice - POLIS.
  3. John L. Czajka & Harold Beebout & Brett Brown & Robert Cohen & Susan Holland & Alberto Martini & Nancy Wemmerus, 1993. "Microsimulation of Family and Household Formation and Dissolution," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 31998386cdb04057a4fc302ef, Mathematica Policy Research.
  4. John L. Czajka & Alberto Martini, 1993. "Microsimulation and Public Policy: A Synopsis of Developments in Modeling and the Role of Policy Analytic Needs," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 76cace5858904e358f8622760, Mathematica Policy Research.
  5. Thomas M. Fraker & Alberto P. Martini & James C. Ohls & Michael Ponza & Elizabeth A. Quinn, 1992. "The Evaluation of the Alabama Food Stamp Cash-Out Demonstration Vol. 1: Recipient Impacts," Mathematica Policy Research Reports bc4fe28e4d704a8a84e7adf0b, Mathematica Policy Research.
  6. Thomas M. Fraker & Alberto P. Martini & James C. Ohls & Michael Ponza & Elizabeth A. Quinn, 1992. "The Evaluation of the Alabama Food Stamp Cash-Out Demonstration Vol. 2: Administrative Outcomes, Overall Conclusions, and Appendices," Mathematica Policy Research Reports f8c9ad58d9af49689a0d600e2, Mathematica Policy Research.

Articles

  1. Alberto Martini & Luca Mo Costabella, 2007. "Evaluating the Unintended Effects on Workers and Firms of a program for Displaced Workers," Politica economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 3, pages 259-288.
  2. Enrico Rettore & Ugo Trivellato & Alberto Martini, 2003. "La valutazione delle politiche del lavoro in presenza di selezione: migliorare la teoria, i metodi o i dati?," Politica economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 3, pages 301-342.
  3. Alberto Martini & Ugo Trivellato, 1997. "The Role of Survey Data in Microsimulation Models for Social Policy Analysis," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 11(1), pages 83-112, April.
  4. Thomas M. Fraker & Alberto P. Martini & James C. Ohls, 1995. "The Effect of Food Stamp Cashout on Food Expenditures: An Assessment of the Findings from Four Demonstrations," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(4), pages 633-649.
  5. Thomas M. Fraker & Alberto P. Martini & James C. Ohls & Michael Ponza, 1995. "The effects of cashing-out food stomps on household food use and the cost of issuing benefits," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(3), pages 372-392.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Thomas M. Fraker & Alberto P. Martini & James C. Ohls & Michael Ponza & Elizabeth A. Quinn, 1992. "The Evaluation of the Alabama Food Stamp Cash-Out Demonstration Vol. 1: Recipient Impacts," Mathematica Policy Research Reports bc4fe28e4d704a8a84e7adf0b, Mathematica Policy Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Hilary W. Hoynes & Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach, 2007. "Consumption Reponses to In-Kind Transfers: Evidence from the Introduction of the Food Stamp Program," Working Papers 0711, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
    2. Marianne Bitler & Hilary Hoynes & Elira Kuka, 2016. "Child Poverty, the Great Recession, and the Social Safety Net in the United States," NBER Working Papers 22682, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Marianne Bitler & Hilary W. Hoynes, 2010. "The State of the Safety Net in the Post-Welfare Reform Era," NBER Working Papers 16504, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Marianne Bitler & Hilary Hoynes, 2013. "The More Things Change, the More They Stay the Same? The Safety Net and Poverty in the Great Recession," NBER Chapters,in: Labor Markets in the Aftermath of the Great Recession, pages 403-444 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Diane Whitmore, 2002. "What Are Food Stamps Worth?," Working Papers 847, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    6. Thomas M. Fraker & Alberto P. Martini & James C. Ohls & Michael Ponza, 1995. "The effects of cashing-out food stomps on household food use and the cost of issuing benefits," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(3), pages 372-392.

  2. Thomas M. Fraker & Alberto P. Martini & James C. Ohls & Michael Ponza & Elizabeth A. Quinn, 1992. "The Evaluation of the Alabama Food Stamp Cash-Out Demonstration Vol. 2: Administrative Outcomes, Overall Conclusions, and Appendices," Mathematica Policy Research Reports f8c9ad58d9af49689a0d600e2, Mathematica Policy Research.

    Cited by:

    1. James C. Ohls & Linda C. Rosenberg & Janet A. Weiss, 1999. "A “Building-up” approach to measuring program costs," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(3), pages 473-480.
    2. Diane Whitmore, 2002. "What Are Food Stamps Worth?," Working Papers 847, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..

Articles

  1. Enrico Rettore & Ugo Trivellato & Alberto Martini, 2003. "La valutazione delle politiche del lavoro in presenza di selezione: migliorare la teoria, i metodi o i dati?," Politica economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 3, pages 301-342.

    Cited by:

    1. Carlo Altavilla & Floro E. Caroleo, 2006. "Evaluating the Dynamic Effects of Active Labour Policies in Italy," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 20(2), pages 349-382, June.
    2. Carlo Altavilla & Floro Ernesto Caroleo, 2011. "Asymmetric Effects of National-based Active Labour Market Policies," CSEF Working Papers 293, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    3. Martina Cioni & Davide Conforti, 2007. "The effectiveness of regional policies for innovation: an empirical investigation," Department of Economics University of Siena 508, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    4. Destefanis, Sergio & Storti, Giuseppe, 2005. "Evaluating Business Incentives Through DEA. An Analysis on Capitalia Firm Data," MPRA Paper 62336, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Elisa BARBIERI & Lauretta RUBINI & Alessandra MICOZZI, 2013. "Evaluating policies for innovation and university-firm relations. An investigation on the attitude of Italian academic entrepreneurs towards collaborations with firms," Economia Marche / Journal of Applied Economics, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I) / Fondazione Aristide Merloni (I), vol. 0(2), pages 17-45, December.

  2. Alberto Martini & Ugo Trivellato, 1997. "The Role of Survey Data in Microsimulation Models for Social Policy Analysis," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 11(1), pages 83-112, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Eugenio Zucchelli & Andrew M Jones & Nigel Rice, 2012. "The evaluation of health policies through dynamic microsimulation methods," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 5(1), pages 2-20.
    2. Zucchelli, E & Jones, A.M & Rice, N, 2010. "The evaluation of health policies through microsimulation methods," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 10/03, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    3. M. Spielauer, 2000. "Microsimulation of Life Course Interactions between Education, Work, Partnership Forms and Children in Five European Countries," Working Papers ir00032, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.
    4. Marike Knoef & Rob Alessie & Adriaan Kalwij, 2013. "Changes in the Income Distribution of the Dutch Elderly between 1989 and 2020: a Dynamic Microsimulation," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 59(3), pages 460-485, September.
    5. Rembert De Blander & Ingrid Schockaert & André Decoster & Patrick Deboosere, 2017. "Projected Population, Inequality and Social Expenditures: The Case of Flanders," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 10(3), pages 92-133.
    6. Ana Kreter & Gianni Betti & Renata Del-Vecchio & Jefferson Staduto, 2015. "The Siena Micro-Simulation Model (SM2): a contribution for informality studies in Brazil," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 49(6), pages 2251-2268, November.
    7. Elisa Baroni & Matteo Richiardi, 2007. "Orcutt’s Vision, 50 years on," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 65, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.

  3. Thomas M. Fraker & Alberto P. Martini & James C. Ohls, 1995. "The Effect of Food Stamp Cashout on Food Expenditures: An Assessment of the Findings from Four Demonstrations," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(4), pages 633-649.

    Cited by:

    1. Gentilini,Ugo, 2016. "The revival of the"cash versus food"debate : new evidence for an old quandary ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7584, The World Bank.
    2. Lorenzo Almada & Ian McCarthy & Rusty Tchernis, 2016. "What Can We Learn about the Effects of Food Stamps on Obesity in the Presence of Misreporting?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 98(4), pages 997-1017.
    3. del Ninno, Carlo & Dorosh, Paul A., 2002. "In-kind transfers and household food consumption," FCND discussion papers 134, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Maximilian D. Schmeiser, 2012. "The impact of long‐term participation in the supplemental nutrition assistance program on child obesity," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(4), pages 386-404, April.
    5. Ryckembusch, David & Frega, Romeo & Silva, Marcio Guilherme & Gentilini, Ugo & Sanogo, Issa & Grede, Nils & Brown, Lynn, 2013. "Enhancing Nutrition: A New Tool for Ex-Ante Comparison of Commodity-based Vouchers and Food Transfers," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 58-67.
    6. Kazianga, Harounan & de Walque, Damien & Alderman, Harold, 2014. "School feeding programs, intrahousehold allocation and the nutrition of siblings: Evidence from a randomized trial in rural Burkina Faso," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 15-34.
    7. Lorenzo Almada & Rusty Tchernis, 2016. "Measuring Effects of Snap on Obesity at the Intensive Margin," Working Papers id:11369, eSocialSciences.
    8. Breunig, Robert & Dasgupta, Indraneel & Gundersen, Craig & Pattanaik, Prasanta, 2001. "Explaining The Food Stamp Cash-Out Puzzle," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33869, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    9. Philip M. Gleason & Anu Rangarajan & Christine Olson, "undated". "Dietary Intake and Dietary Attitudes Among Food Stamp Participants and Other Low-Income Individuals," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 7de7096e094445cba404d4e97, Mathematica Policy Research.
    10. Hidrobo, Melissa & Hoddinott, John F. & Peterman, Amber & Margolies, Amy & Moreira, Vanessa, 2012. "Cash, food, or vouchers?: Evidence from a randomized experiment in northern Ecuador," IFPRI discussion papers 1234, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    11. World Bank Group, 2016. "Cash Transfers in Humanitarian Contexts," World Bank Other Operational Studies 24699, The World Bank.
    12. Gentilini, Ugo, 2014. "Our daily bread : what is the evidence on comparing cash versus food transfers?," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 89502, The World Bank.
    13. Breunig & R. & Dasgupta, I., 1999. "Are People Ashamed of Paying with Food Stamps?," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 1999-382, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    14. Lindsey Leininger & Helen Levy & Diane Schanzenbach, 2010. "Consequences of SCHIP Expansions for Household Well-Being," NBER Chapters,in: Frontiers in Health Policy Research, volume 13 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Wilde, Parke E., 2001. "The Food Stamp Benefit Formula: Implications For Empirical Research On Food Demand," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(01), July.
    16. Kira M. Villa & Christopher B. Barrett & David R. Just, 2011. "Differential Nutritional Responses across Various Income Sources Among East African Pastoralists: Intrahousehold Effects, Missing Markets and Mental Accounting," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 20(2), pages 341-375, March.
    17. Prasad Krishnamurthy & Vikram Pathania & Sharad Tandon, 2017. "Food Price Subsidies and Nutrition: Evidence from State Reforms to India’s Public Distribution System," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66(1), pages 55-90.
    18. Karen Macours & Norbert Schady & Renos Vakis, 2011. "Cash Transfers, Behavioral Changes, and Cognitive Development in Early Childhood: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," Working Papers 2011-007, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    19. Angus Deaton & Christina Paxson, 1998. "Economies of Scale, Household Size, and the Demand for Food," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 897-930, October.
    20. Thomas Vartanian & Linda Houser, 2012. "The Effects of Childhood SNAP Use and Neighborhood Conditions on Adult Body Mass Index," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(3), pages 1127-1154, August.
    21. Schady, Norbert & Rosero, José, 2008. "Are cash transfers made to women spent like other sources of income?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 101(3), pages 246-248, December.
    22. Han, Euna & Powell, Lisa M. & Pugach, Oksana, 2011. "The heterogenous relationship of food stamp participation with body mass: Quantile regression model," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 499-506, August.
    23. Jesse Cunha, 2010. "Testing Paternalism: Cash vs. In-kind Transfer in Rural Mexico," Discussion Papers 09-021, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    24. Neeraj Kaushal & Qin Gao, 2011. "Food Stamp Program and Consumption Choices," NBER Chapters,in: Economic Aspects of Obesity, pages 223-247 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    25. Harounan Kazianga & Damien de Walque & Harold Alderman, 2009. "School Feeding Programs and th e Nutrition of Siblings: Evidence from a Randomized Trial in Rural Burkina Faso," Economics Working Paper Series 0908, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
    26. Christina Paxson & Norbert Schady, 2010. "Does Money Matter? The Effects of Cash Transfers on Child Development in Rural Ecuador," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(1), pages 187-229, October.
    27. Ariel Fiszbein & Norbert Schady & Francisco H.G. Ferreira & Margaret Grosh & Niall Keleher & Pedro Olinto & Emmanuel Skoufias, 2009. "Conditional Cash Transfers : Reducing Present and Future Poverty," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2597.
    28. Han, Euna & Powell, Lisa M. & Isgor, Zeynep, 2012. "Supplemental nutrition assistance program and body weight outcomes: The role of economic contextual factors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(12), pages 1874-1881.
    29. Hoddinott, John & Margolies, Amy, 2012. "Mapping the Impacts of Food Aid: Current Knowledge and Future Directions," WIDER Working Paper Series 034, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    30. Carpio, Carlos E. & Boonsaeng, Tullaya & Chen, Zhen & Okrent, Abigail, 2014. "The Effect of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program on Food and Nonfood Spending Among Low-Income Households," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170650, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    31. Kim, Jiyoon, 2016. "Do SNAP participants expand non-food spending when they receive more SNAP Benefits?—Evidence from the 2009 SNAP benefits increase," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 9-20.
    32. Aker,Jenny C., 2015. "Comparing cash and voucher transfers in a humanitarian context : evidence from the Democratic Republic of Congo," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7469, The World Bank.
    33. Margaret Grosh & Carlo del Ninno & Emil Tesliuc & Azedine Ouerghi, 2008. "For Protection and Promotion : The Design and Implementation of Effective Safety Nets," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6582.

  4. Thomas M. Fraker & Alberto P. Martini & James C. Ohls & Michael Ponza, 1995. "The effects of cashing-out food stomps on household food use and the cost of issuing benefits," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(3), pages 372-392.

    Cited by:

    1. Rachel Griffith & Sarah Smith & Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2014. "Getting a healthy start? Nudge versus economic incentives," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 14/328, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    2. Lucie Schmidt & Lara Shore-Sheppard & Tara Watson, 2016. "The Effect of Safety-Net Programs on Food Insecurity," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 51(3), pages 589-614.
    3. Diane Whitmore, 2002. "What Are Food Stamps Worth?," Working Papers 847, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    4. Andrea Brandolini & Silvia Magri & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2010. "Asset-based measurement of poverty," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 755, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    5. Bishop, John A. & Formby, John P. & Zeager, Lester A., 2000. "The effect of food stamp cashout on undernutrition," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 75-85, April.

More information

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

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  1. No paper was announced in a field specific NEP report

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