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The Role of Survey Data in Microsimulation Models for Social Policy Analysis

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  • Alberto Martini
  • Ugo Trivellato

Abstract

Questions about the impact of social policies cannot be answered solely on the basis of official statistics made available in tabular format. The access to microdata allows policy analysts to answer these questions with a larger set of analytical tools, in particular microsimulation models. This paper examines the interface between survey data and microsimulation models. We review different types of microsimulation models (static and dynamic) and their data requirements. We then restrict the attention to survey-based microdata, and examine issues in survey design, questionnaire content, data quality, and dissemination policy that are important from the perspective of microsimulation. Copyright Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishers Ltd 1997.

Suggested Citation

  • Alberto Martini & Ugo Trivellato, 1997. "The Role of Survey Data in Microsimulation Models for Social Policy Analysis," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 11(1), pages 83-112, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:11:y:1997:i:1:p:83-112
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. M. Spielauer, 2000. "Microsimulation of Life Course Interactions between Education, Work, Partnership Forms and Children in Five European Countries," Working Papers ir00032, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.
    2. Eugenio Zucchelli & Andrew M Jones & Nigel Rice, 2012. "The evaluation of health policies through dynamic microsimulation methods," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 5(1), pages 2-20.
    3. Ana Kreter & Gianni Betti & Renata Del-Vecchio & Jefferson Staduto, 2015. "The Siena Micro-Simulation Model (SM2): a contribution for informality studies in Brazil," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 49(6), pages 2251-2268, November.
    4. Zucchelli, E & Jones, A.M & Rice, N, 2010. "The evaluation of health policies through microsimulation methods," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 10/03, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    5. Elisa Baroni & Matteo Richiardi, 2007. "Orcutt’s Vision, 50 years on," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 65, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.

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