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School feeding programs, intrahousehold allocation and the nutrition of siblings: Evidence from a randomized trial in rural Burkina Faso

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  • Kazianga, Harounan
  • de Walque, Damien
  • Alderman, Harold

Abstract

We evaluate the impact of two school feeding schemes on health outcomes of pre-school age children in Burkina Faso: school meals which provide students with lunch each school day, and take home rations which provide girls with 10kg of cereal flour each month, conditional on 90% attendance rate. We investigated the pass through to younger siblings of the beneficiaries and found that take home rations have increased weight-for-age of boys and girls under age 5 by 0.4 standard deviations compared to a control group. In the same age range, school meals did not have any significant effect on weights of siblings. We provide suggestive evidence indicating that most of the gains are realized through intra-household food reallocation.

Suggested Citation

  • Kazianga, Harounan & de Walque, Damien & Alderman, Harold, 2014. "School feeding programs, intrahousehold allocation and the nutrition of siblings: Evidence from a randomized trial in rural Burkina Faso," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 15-34.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:106:y:2014:i:c:p:15-34
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jdeveco.2013.08.007
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    3. Gentilini,Ugo, 2016. "The revival of the"cash versus food"debate : new evidence for an old quandary ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7584, The World Bank.
    4. Adams, Katherine P. & Lybbert, Travis J. & Vosti, Stephen A. & Ayifah, Emmanuel & Arimond, Mary & Adu-Afarwuah, Seth & Dewey, Kathryn G., 2018. "Unintended effects of a targeted maternal and child nutrition intervention on household expenditures, labor income, and the nutritional status of non-targeted siblings in Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 138-150.
    5. Patricia Justino & Marinella Leone & Pierfrancesco Rolla & Monique Abimpaye & Caroline Dusabe & Diane Uwamahoro & Richard Germond, 2020. "Improving parenting practices for early child development: Experimental evidence from Rwanda," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-72, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Teresa Molina Millán & Karen Macours, 2017. "Attrition in randomized control trials: Using tracking information to correct bias," FEUNL Working Paper Series novaf:wp1702, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
    7. Teresa Molina Millan & Karen Macours, 2017. "Attrition in randomized control trials: Using tracking information to correct bias," NOVAFRICA Working Paper Series wp1702, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Nova School of Business and Economics, NOVAFRICA.
    8. Wang, Haining & Cheng, Zhiming, 2022. "Kids eat free: School feeding and family spending on education," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 193(C), pages 196-212.
    9. Lovo, Stefania & Veronesi, Marcella, 2019. "Crop Diversification and Child Health: Empirical Evidence From Tanzania," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 168-179.
    10. Harounan Kazianga & Leigh Linden & Ali Protik & Matt Sloan, 2015. "Impact Evaluation of Burkina Faso's BRIGHT Program: Design Report," Mathematica Policy Research Reports c0250cd3f27d448ea70d909c3, Mathematica Policy Research.
    11. Independent Evaluation Group, 2014. "Social Safety Nets and Gender : Learning from Impact Evaluations and World Bank Projects," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 21365, November.
    12. Harounan Kazianga & Leigh Linden & Ali Protik & Matt Sloan, 2016. "The Medium-Term Impacts of Girl-Friendly Schools: Seven-Year Evidence from School Construction in Burkina Faso," Development Working Papers 406, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 11 Nov 2016.
    13. Alison Buttenheim & Harold Alderman & Jed Friedman, 2011. "Impact evaluation of school feeding programmes in Lao People's Democratic Republic," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(4), pages 520-542, December.
    14. Salazar, Lina & Aramburu, Julián & González-Flores, Mario & Winters, Paul, 2016. "Sowing for food security: A case study of smallholder farmers in Bolivia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 32-52.
    15. Alderman, Harold, 2014. "Can transfer programs be made more nutrition sensitive?:," IFPRI discussion papers 1342, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    16. Gentilini, Ugo, 2014. "Our daily bread : what is the evidence on comparing cash versus food transfers?," Social Protection Discussion Papers and Notes 89502, The World Bank.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    School feeding; Pre-school age children nutrition; Intra-household; Randomized trial;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H - Public Economics
    • I - Health, Education, and Welfare
    • O - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth

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