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Can transfer programs be made more nutrition sensitive?:

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  • Alderman, Harold

Abstract

Malnutrition can best be addressed by a combination of nutrition specific interventions and nutrition sensitive programs, including social protection. This study reviews mechanisms of transfer program in order to better design nutrition sensitive social protection. Social protection programs typically increase income as well as influence the timing and, to a degree, control of this income. Additionally, social protection programs may achieve further impact on nutrition by fostering linkages with health services or with sanitation programs, and specifically through activities that are related to nutrition education or micronutrient supplementation. This paper discusses what might be expected from such programs and reviews some of the evidence from specific transfer programs.

Suggested Citation

  • Alderman, Harold, 2014. "Can transfer programs be made more nutrition sensitive?:," IFPRI discussion papers 1342, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1342
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    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ifpridp01342.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Porter, Catherine & Goyal, Radhika, 2016. "Social protection for all ages? Impacts of Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program on child nutrition," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 92-99.
    2. International Food Policy Research Institute, 2014. "Global Nutrition Report 2014: Actions and accountability to accelerate the world’s progress on nutrition," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 978-0-89629-564-3.
    3. Gentilini, Ugo, 2014. "Our daily bread : what is the evidence on comparing cash versus food transfers?," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 89502, The World Bank.
    4. United Nations Children's Fund UNICEF, 2016. "Stop Stunting in South Asia: A Common Narrative on Maternal and Child Nutrition," Working Papers id:10800, eSocialSciences.
    5. Gonzalez, Ana Elena Meza & Wieck, Christine, 2014. "Food and Nutrient Demand in the context of the Conditional Cash Transfer “Oportunidades” in Mexico," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182834, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. International Food Policy Research Institute, 2015. "Global Nutrition Report: Actions and Accountability to Accelerate the World’s Progress on Nutrition," Working Papers id:7417, eSocialSciences.

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    Keywords

    food security; social policies; Nutrition; resilience; cash transfers; social protection; social safety nets;

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