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How Effective are Cash Transfer Programs at Improving Nutritional Status?

Author

Listed:
  • Seth R. Gitter

    (Department of Economics, Towson University)

  • James Manley

    (Department of Economics, Towson University)

  • Vanya Slavchevska

    (American University)

Abstract

Cash transfer programs have not always affected children�s nutritional status. We reviewed 30,000 articles relating cash transfer programs and height for age, finding 21 papers on 17 programs. Applying meta-analysis we examine the overarching relationship, finding that the programs� average impact on height-for-age is positive, but small and not statistically significant. We evaluate many program, child and local characteristics� correlation with estimated outcome. Conditional programs statistically accomplish the same as unconditional. However, conditionalities not related to health or education strongly inhibit child growth. We see girls benefiting more than boys and more disadvantaged areas benefiting more.

Suggested Citation

  • Seth R. Gitter & James Manley & Vanya Slavchevska, 2010. "How Effective are Cash Transfer Programs at Improving Nutritional Status?," Working Papers 2010-18, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:tow:wpaper:2010-18
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Seth R. Gitter & James Manley & Bradford Barham, 2011. "The Coffee Crisis, Early Childhood Development, and Conditional Cash Transfers," Research Department Publications 4715, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    2. Jere R. Behrman & John Hoddinott, 2005. "Programme Evaluation with Unobserved Heterogeneity and Selective Implementation: The Mexican PROGRESA Impact on Child Nutrition," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 67(4), pages 547-569, August.
    3. Maluccio, John A., 2005. "Coping with the “coffee crisis” in Central America: The Role of the Nicaraguan Red de Protección Social," FCND discussion papers 188, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Jef L. Leroy & Marie Ruel & Ellen Verhofstadt, 2009. "The impact of conditional cash transfer programmes on child nutrition: a review of evidence using a programme theory framework," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 103-129, June.
    5. Mauricio Leon & Stephen Younger, 2007. "Transfer payments, mothers' income and child health in ecuador," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(6), pages 1126-1143.
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    Cited by:

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    2. Saini, Shweta & Sharma, Sameedh & Gulati, Ashok & Hussain, Siraj & von Braun, Joachim, 2017. "Indian food and welfare schemes: Scope for digitization towards cash transfers," Discussion Papers 261791, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    3. Franziska Gassmann & Cecile Cherrier & Andrés Mideros Mora & Pierre Mohnen, 2013. "Making the Investment Case for Social Protection: Methodological challenges with lessons learnt from a recent study in Cambodia," Papers inwopa694, Innocenti Working Papers.
    4. Jennifer Waidler & Stephen Devereux, 2019. "Social grants, remittances, and food security: does the source of income matter?," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 11(3), pages 679-702, June.
    5. Marta Kozicka & Regine Weber & Matthias Kalkuhl, 2016. "Public Distribution System vs. Market: Analysis of Wheat and Rice Consumption in India," FOODSECURE Working papers 40, LEI Wageningen UR.
    6. Naila Kabeer & Hugh Waddington, 2015. "Economic impacts of conditional cash transfer programmes: a systematic review and meta-analysis," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(3), pages 290-303, September.
    7. Abhijit Banerjee, 2016. "Policies for a better-fed world," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 152(1), pages 3-17, February.
    8. van den Bold, Mara & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Gillespie, Stuart, 2013. "Women’s empowerment and nutrition: An evidence review:," IFPRI discussion papers 1294, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Ashrita Saran & Howard White & Kerry Albright & Jill Adona, 2020. "Mega‐map of systematic reviews and evidence and gap maps on the interventions to improve child well‐being in low‐ and middle‐income countries," Campbell Systematic Reviews, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 16(4), December.
    10. Evelyn L. Forget & Alexander D. Peden & Stephenson B. Strobel, 2013. "Cash Transfers, Basic Income and Community Building," Social Inclusion, Cogitatio Press, vol. 1(2), pages 84-91.
    11. Ryckembusch, David & Frega, Romeo & Silva, Marcio Guilherme & Gentilini, Ugo & Sanogo, Issa & Grede, Nils & Brown, Lynn, 2013. "Enhancing Nutrition: A New Tool for Ex-Ante Comparison of Commodity-based Vouchers and Food Transfers," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 58-67.
    12. Handa, Sudhanshu & Natali, Luisa & Seidenfeld, David & Tembo, Gelson & Davis, Benjamin, 2018. "Can unconditional cash transfers raise long-term living standards? Evidence from Zambia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 42-65.
    13. Ashwini Sebastian & Ana Paula de la O Campos & Silvio Daidone & Benjamin Davis & Ousmane Niang & Luca Pellerano, 2016. "Gender differences in child investment behaviour among agricultural households: Evidence from the Lesotho Child Grants Programme," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2016-107, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    14. Ashwini Sebastian & Ana Paula de la O Campos & Silvio Daidone & Noemi Pace & Benjamin Davis & Ousmane Niang & Luca Pellerano, 2019. "Cash Transfers and Gender Differentials in Child Schooling and Labor: Evidence from the Lesotho Child Grants Programme," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 45(S1), pages 181-208, December.
    15. Nicola Brandt, 2012. "Reducing Poverty in Chile: Cash Transfers and Better Jobs," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 951, OECD Publishing.
    16. Ashwini Sebastian & Ana Paula de la O Campos & Silvio Daidone & Benjamin Davis & Ousmane Niang & Luca Pellerano, 2016. "Gender differences in child investment behaviour among agricultural households: Evidence from the Lesotho Child Grants Programme," WIDER Working Paper Series 107, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    17. Alderman, Harold, 2014. "Can transfer programs be made more nutrition sensitive?:," IFPRI discussion papers 1342, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Latin America; Cash Transfer Programs.;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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