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Are cash transfers the answer for child nutrition in sub‐Saharan Africa? A literature review

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  • James Manley
  • Vanya Slavchevska

Abstract

Early evidence is ambiguous on the effects of cash transfer programmes on children, but until the last few years there has been little focus on Africa. We review the literature on 20 cash transfer schemes, including 12 from sub‐Saharan Africa. Such interventions have shown improvements in household diet and, in some cases, to agriculture, but have not always improved child health. However, a larger perspective focusing on two key time periods for nutrition—adolescence and the first 1,000 days of life reveals more opportunities for impact. In particular, the opportunity to empower young women to access secondary education and the reduction of adolescent pregnancy rates can improve the health of African children. Cash transfer programmes show promise, though there is room for improvement.

Suggested Citation

  • James Manley & Vanya Slavchevska, 2019. "Are cash transfers the answer for child nutrition in sub‐Saharan Africa? A literature review," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 37(2), pages 204-224, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:devpol:v:37:y:2019:i:2:p:204-224
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/dpr.12346
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