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Opening Up Pandora's Box: The Effect of Gender Targeting and Conditionality on Household Spending Behavior in Mexico's Progresa Program

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  • Handa, Sudhanshu
  • Peterman, Amber
  • Davis, Benjamin
  • Stampini, Marco

Abstract

Summary This paper evaluates the behavioral impact of conditionality and gender targeting on spending behavior in the Progresa conditional cash transfer (CCT) program from rural Mexico. Results indicate that transfer income is not spent differently from general income, suggesting that transfers exert only an income effect. In addition, women who have increased control over their extra cash are not significantly more likely to spend it in a "family-friendly" way than they do household earned income. Both features entail significant costs to beneficiaries and program budgets; our results indicate that further evidence is needed to confidently advocate for their inclusion in cash transfer (CT) programs.

Suggested Citation

  • Handa, Sudhanshu & Peterman, Amber & Davis, Benjamin & Stampini, Marco, 2009. "Opening Up Pandora's Box: The Effect of Gender Targeting and Conditionality on Household Spending Behavior in Mexico's Progresa Program," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1129-1142, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:37:y:2009:i:6:p:1129-1142
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jorge M. Aguero & Michael R. Carter & Ingrid Woolard, 2006. "The Impact of Unconditional Cash Transfers on Nutrition: The South African Child Support Grant," SALDRU Working Papers 8, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    2. Robert Breunig & Indraneel Dasgupta, 2005. "Do Intra-Household Effects Generate the Food Stamp Cash-Out Puzzle?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(3), pages 552-568.
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    4. Mauricio Leon & Stephen Younger, 2007. "Transfer payments, mothers' income and child health in ecuador," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(6), pages 1126-1143.
    5. Jishnu Das, 2005. "Reassessing Conditional Cash Transfer Programs," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 20(1), pages 57-80.
    6. J. William Levedahl, 1995. "A Theoretical and Empirical Evaluation of the Functional Forms Used to Estimate the Food Expenditure Equation of Food Stamp Recipients," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 77(4), pages 960-968.
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    Cited by:

    1. de Brauw, Alan & Gilligan, Daniel O. & Hoddinott, John & Roy, Shalini, 2014. "The Impact of Bolsa Família on Women’s Decision-Making Power," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 487-504.
    2. Roy, Shalini & Ara, Jinnat & Das, Narayan & Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2015. "“Flypaper effects” in transfers targeted to women: Evidence from BRAC's “Targeting the Ultra Poor” program in Bangladesh," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 1-19.
    3. Noemi Pace & Silvio Daidone & Benjamin Davis & Luca Pellerano, 2016. "Does “soft conditionality” increase the impact of cash transfers on desired outcomes? Evidence from a randomized control trial in Lesotho," Working Papers 2016:33, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    4. repec:bla:devpol:v:35:y:2017:i:5:p:621-643 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Bergolo, Marcelo & Galván, Estefanía, 2018. "Intra-household Behavioral Responses to Cash Transfer Programs. Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 100-118.
    6. Jaime Andrés Sarmiento Espinel, 2012. "Parental investment in their children’s education," Serie documentos de trabajo del Centro de Estudios Económicos 2012-09, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos.
    7. Margherita Calderone, 2017. "Are there different spillover effects from cash transfers to men and women? Impacts on investments in education in post-war Uganda," WIDER Working Paper Series 093, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. van den Bold, Mara & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Gillespie, Stuart, 2013. "Women’s empowerment and nutrition: An evidence review:," IFPRI discussion papers 1294, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Sudhanshu Handa & David Seidenfeld & Benjamin Davis & Gelson Tembo & Zambia Cash Transfer Evaluation Team, 2014. "Are Cash Transfers a Silver Bullet? Evidence from the Zambian Child Grant," Papers inwopa731, Innocenti Working Papers.
    10. Mabel Andalón & Jenny Williams & Michael Grossman, 2014. "Empowering Women: The Effect of Schooling on Young Women's Knowledge and Use of Contraception," NBER Working Papers 19961, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Das, Narayan & Yasmin, Rabeya & Ara, Jinnat & Kamruzzaman, Md. & Davis, Peter & Behrman, Julia A. & Roy, Shalini & Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2013. "How do intrahousehold dynamics change when assets are transferred to women? Evidence from BRAC’s Challenging the Frontiers of Poverty Reduction—Targeting the Ultra Poor program in Bangladesh:," IFPRI discussion papers 1317, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    12. Jaime Andres Sarmiento Espinel & Edwin van Gameren, 2016. "A collective household labor supply model with children and non-participation: Theory and empirical application," Serie documentos de trabajo del Centro de Estudios Económicos 2016-11, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos.
    13. Narayan Das & Rabeya Yasmin, 2014. "How Do Intrahousehold Dynamics Change When Assets are Transferred to Women? Evidence from BRAC’s Challenging the Frontiers of Poverty Reduction—Targeting the Ultra Poor Program in Bangladesh," Working Papers id:5698, eSocialSciences.
    14. Independent Evaluation Group, 2014. "Social Safety Nets and Gender : Learning from Impact Evaluations and World Bank Projects," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 21365.
    15. Escobal, Javier & Benites, Sara, 2012. "Algunos impactos del programa JUNTOS en el bienestar de los niños: Evidencia basada en el estudio Niños del Milenio
      [Impacts of the Conditional Cash Transfer programme JUNTOS for children in Peru]
      ," MPRA Paper 56480, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. repec:emx:esteco:v:33:y:2018:i:1:p:65-115 is not listed on IDEAS

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