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How Effective are Cash Transfer Programs at Improving Nutritional Status?

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  • Manley, James G.
  • Gitter, Seth R.
  • Slavchevska, Vanya

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Manley, James G. & Gitter, Seth R. & Slavchevska, Vanya, 2011. "How Effective are Cash Transfer Programs at Improving Nutritional Status?," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 103157, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea11:103157
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/103157
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jef L. Leroy & Marie Ruel & Ellen Verhofstadt, 2009. "The impact of conditional cash transfer programmes on child nutrition: a review of evidence using a programme theory framework," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 103-129, June.
    2. Seth Gitter & James Manley & Brad Barham, 2011. "The Coffee Crisis, Early Childhood Development, and Conditional Cash Transfers," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 3111, Inter-American Development Bank.
    3. Jere R. Behrman & John Hoddinott, 2005. "Programme Evaluation with Unobserved Heterogeneity and Selective Implementation: The Mexican "PROGRESA" Impact on Child Nutrition," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 67(4), pages 547-569, August.
    4. Maluccio, John A., 2005. "Coping with the “coffee crisis” in Central America: The Role of the Nicaraguan Red de Protección Social," FCND discussion papers 188, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Mauricio Leon & Stephen Younger, 2007. "Transfer payments, mothers' income and child health in ecuador," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(6), pages 1126-1143.
    6. Seth Gitter & James Manley & Brad Barham, 2011. "The Coffee Crisis, Early Childhood Development, and Conditional Cash Transfers," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 3111, Inter-American Development Bank.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Shweta Saini & Sameedh Sharma & Ashok Gulati & Siraj Hussain & Joachim von Braun, 2017. "Indian Food and Welfare Schemes: Scope for Digitization Towards Cash Transfers," Working Papers id:12033, eSocialSciences.
    2. Franziska Gassmann & Cecile Cherrier & Andrés Mideros Mora & Pierre Mohnen, 2013. "Making the Investment Case for Social Protection: Methodological challenges with lessons learnt from a recent study in Cambodia," Papers inwopa694, Innocenti Working Papers.
    3. Marta Kozicka & Regine Weber & Matthias Kalkuhl, 2016. "Public Distribution System vs. Market: Analysis of Wheat and Rice Consumption in India," FOODSECURE Working papers 40, LEI Wageningen UR.
    4. Naila Kabeer & Hugh Waddington, 2015. "Economic impacts of conditional cash transfer programmes: a systematic review and meta-analysis," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(3), pages 290-303, September.
    5. Abhijit Banerjee, 2015. "Policies for a Better-Fed World," Working Papers id:7623, eSocialSciences.
    6. Abhijit Banerjee, 2015. "Policies for a Better-fed World," NBER Working Papers 21623, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. van den Bold, Mara & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Gillespie, Stuart, 2013. "Women’s empowerment and nutrition: An evidence review:," IFPRI discussion papers 1294, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Evelyn L. Forget & Alexander D. Peden & Stephenson B. Strobel, 2013. "Cash Transfers, Basic Income and Community Building," Social Inclusion, Cogitatio Press, vol. 1(2), pages 84-91.
    9. Ryckembusch, David & Frega, Romeo & Silva, Marcio Guilherme & Gentilini, Ugo & Sanogo, Issa & Grede, Nils & Brown, Lynn, 2013. "Enhancing Nutrition: A New Tool for Ex-Ante Comparison of Commodity-based Vouchers and Food Transfers," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 58-67.
    10. Nicola Brandt, 2012. "Reducing Poverty in Chile: Cash Transfers and Better Jobs," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 951, OECD Publishing.
    11. Ashwini Sebastian & Ana Paula de la O Campos & Silvio Daidone & Benjamin Davis & Ousmane Niang & Luca Pellerano, 2016. "Gender differences in child investment behaviour among agricultural households: Evidence from the Lesotho Child Grants Programme," WIDER Working Paper Series 107, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    12. Alderman, Harold, 2014. "Can transfer programs be made more nutrition sensitive?:," IFPRI discussion papers 1342, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    13. Abhijit V. Banerjee, 2016. "Policies for a better-fed world," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 152(1), pages 3-17, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cash transfers; nutrition; child health; International Development; O1;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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