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Economic impacts of conditional cash transfer programmes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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  • Naila Kabeer
  • Hugh Waddington

Abstract

The results of a systematic review of evidence on the effects of conditional cash transfer (CCT) programmes on household economic outcomes are presented. Out of 1076 original articles found through electronic and handsearches, 46 randomised and quasi-experimental impact evaluations were eligible for the review. The authors used statistical meta-analysis and analysis of programme mechanisms to explore heterogeneity in impacts between and within programmes. They conclude that, for households which benefited from those CCT programmes which have been rigorously evaluated, child labour decreased, particularly for boys, household consumption and investment increased and consumption smoothing improved. In addition, there were limited effects on girls' labour and mixed effects on adult labour supply in beneficiary households. Limited evidence has been collected on locality-wide impacts in beneficiary communities.

Suggested Citation

  • Naila Kabeer & Hugh Waddington, 2015. "Economic impacts of conditional cash transfer programmes: a systematic review and meta-analysis," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(3), pages 290-303, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevef:v:7:y:2015:i:3:p:290-303
    DOI: 10.1080/19439342.2015.1068833
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kazushi Takahashi & Yukichi Mano & Keijiro Otsuka, 2018. "Spillovers as a Driver to Reduce Ex-post Inequality Generated by Randomized Experiments: Evidence from an Agricultural Training Intervention," Working Papers 174, JICA Research Institute.
    2. repec:eee:jeborg:v:149:y:2018:i:c:p:372-388 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Dragan Filipovich & Miguel Niño-Zarazúa & Alma Santillán Hernández, 2018. "Campaign externalities, programmatic spending, and voting preferences in rural Mexico: The case of Progresa-Oportunidades-Prospera programme," WIDER Working Paper Series 027, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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