IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/jdevef/v1y2009i2p103-129.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The impact of conditional cash transfer programmes on child nutrition: a review of evidence using a programme theory framework

Author

Listed:
  • Jef L. Leroy
  • Marie Ruel
  • Ellen Verhofstadt

Abstract

The authors reviewed the evidence regarding the impact of conditional cash transfer (CCT) programmes on child nutrition outcomes, using a programme theory framework. They developed a programme impact model and synthesised evidence regarding the pathways through which CCTs may improve child nutrition. CCT programmes significantly improve child anthropometry but have very little impact on micronutrient status. The programmes also have a positive impact on several of the outcomes in the pathways to improved nutrition. The authors found an enormous gap in knowledge about the mechanisms by which CCT programmes improve nutrition. In order to reach their full potential, the programmes need to have a better defined set of nutrition actions grounded in programme theory.

Suggested Citation

  • Jef L. Leroy & Marie Ruel & Ellen Verhofstadt, 2009. "The impact of conditional cash transfer programmes on child nutrition: a review of evidence using a programme theory framework," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 103-129, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevef:v:1:y:2009:i:2:p:103-129
    DOI: 10.1080/19439340902924043
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/19439340902924043
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Porter, Catherine & Goyal, Radhika, 2016. "Social protection for all ages? Impacts of Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program on child nutrition," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 92-99.
    2. Manley, James & Gitter, Seth & Slavchevska, Vanya, 2013. "How Effective are Cash Transfers at Improving Nutritional Status?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 133-155.
    3. Naila Kabeer & Hugh Waddington, 2015. "Economic impacts of conditional cash transfer programmes: a systematic review and meta-analysis," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(3), pages 290-303, September.
    4. repec:bla:devpol:v:35:y:2017:i:5:p:621-643 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Schmeer, Kammi K., 2013. "Family structure and child anemia in Mexico," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 16-23.
    6. Alderman, Harold, 2014. "Can transfer programs be made more nutrition sensitive?:," IFPRI discussion papers 1342, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Seth R. Gitter & James Manley & Vanya Slavchevska, 2010. "How Effective are Cash Transfer Programs at Improving Nutritional Status?," Working Papers 2010-18, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2012.
    8. Oral Capps Jr. & Sergio Colin‐Castillo & Manuel A. Hernandez, 2013. "Do Marketing Margins Change with Food Scares? Examining the Effects of Food Recalls and Disease Outbreaks in the U.S. Red Meat Industry," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(4), pages 426-454, September.
    9. van den Bold, Mara & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Gillespie, Stuart, 2013. "Women’s empowerment and nutrition: An evidence review:," IFPRI discussion papers 1294, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Limodio, Nicola, 2011. "The impact of pro-vulnerable income transfers : Leisure, dependency and a distribution hypothesis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5881, The World Bank.
    11. repec:spr:ssefpa:v:9:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s12571-017-0703-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. David K. Evans & Anna Popova, 2017. "Cash Transfers and Temptation Goods," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65(2), pages 189-221.
    13. Gentilini, Ugo & Omamo, Steven Were, 2011. "Social protection 2.0: Exploring issues, evidence and debates in a globalizing world," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 329-340, June.
    14. Tagel Gebrehiwot & Carolina Castilla, 2018. "Do safety net transfers improve household diets and reduce undernutrition? Evidence from rural Ethiopia," Working Papers PMMA 2018-03, PEP-PMMA.
    15. Lentz, Erin C. & Barrett, Christopher B., 2013. "The economics and nutritional impacts of food assistance policies and programs," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 151-163.
    16. Heinrich, Carolyn J. & Brill, Robert, 2015. "Stopped in the Name of the Law: Administrative Burden and its Implications for Cash Transfer Program Effectiveness," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 277-295.
    17. repec:fpr:export:1342 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Gonzalez, Ana Elena Meza & Wieck, Christine, 2014. "Food and Nutrient Demand in the context of the Conditional Cash Transfer “Oportunidades” in Mexico," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182834, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:jdevef:v:1:y:2009:i:2:p:103-129. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/RJDE20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.