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Integrating survey and ethnographic methods to evaluate conditional cash transfer programs:

  • Adato, Michelle

"Survey and ethnographic methods have been combined in the evaluations of conditional cash transfer (CCT) programs for the governments of Nicaragua and Turkey. This paper describes the quantitative and qualitative research designs for these evaluations, discusses the relative benefits of quantitative and qualitative approaches for studying CCTs, and provides examples of how findings of these different approaches complemented, explained, illuminated, or contradicted each other. While the surveys provided reliable measures of program impacts on human capital, the qualitative research provided explanations of why we do or do not find these impacts, and explored how social processes and social relations were affected by, and in turn shaped responses to, the programs. While many official evaluations now require mixed methods, and these have demonstrated policy relevance and impacts, there is still considerable progress to be made with respect to how methods are integrated in practice and how mixed approaches are appreciated in social program evaluation." from authors' abstract

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Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series IFPRI discussion papers with number 810.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:810
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  1. Adato, Michelle & Ahmed, Akhter U. & Lund, Francie, 2004. "Linking safety nets, social protection, and poverty reduction," 2020 vision briefs 12, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Adato, Michelle & Hoddinott, John & Haddad, Lawrence James, 2005. "Power, politics, and performance: community participation in South African public works programs," Research reports 143, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Place, Frank & Adato, Michelle & Hebinck, Paul, 2007. "Understanding Rural Poverty and Investment in Agriculture: An Assessment of Integrated Quantitative and Qualitative Research in Western Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 312-325, February.
  4. Laura B. Rawlings, 2005. "Evaluating the Impact of Conditional Cash Transfer Programs," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 20(1), pages 29-55.
  5. Maluccio, John A. & Flores, Rafael, 2005. "Impact evaluation of a conditional cash transfer program: the Nicaraguan Red de ProtecciĆ³n Social," Research reports 141, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. de Brauw, Alan & Hoddinott, John, 2011. "Must conditional cash transfer programs be conditioned to be effective? The impact of conditioning transfers on school enrollment in Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 359-370, November.
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