IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/b/iie/ppress/cgd376.html
   My bibliography  Save this book

From Social Assistance to Social Development: Targeted Education Subsidies in Developing Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Morley, Samuel

    (Center for Global Development)

  • David Coady

    (Center for Global Development)

Abstract

Samuel Morley and David Coady demonstrate how a promising new alternative to standard donor-financed education programs--the conditioned transfer for education (CTE) program--can advance both poverty reduction and education goals at the same time. CTE programs meet the immediate needs of the poorest families by providing cash or food but only on the condition that they keep their children in school. These transfers reduce poverty in the short run, and the additional education of the children of poor families breaks the long-run cycle of poverty by increasing their earning potential.The book compiles a vast amount of unpublished and published material on existing CTE programs and their impact on poverty. Groundbreaking case studies and detailed evaluations of programs in Mexico, Brazil, Bangladesh, Nicaragua, Honduras, and Chile add up to an unusual and surprising success story for skeptics of development and foreign aid.

Suggested Citation

  • Morley, Samuel & David Coady, 2003. "From Social Assistance to Social Development: Targeted Education Subsidies in Developing Countries," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number cgd376.
  • Handle: RePEc:iie:ppress:cgd376
    Note: Center for Global Development book
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://bookstore.piie.com/book-store/376.html
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Emanuela di Gropello, 2006. "Meeting the Challenges of Secondary Education in Latin America and East Asia : Improving Efficiency and Resource Mobilization," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7173, January.
    2. Elbers, Chris & Fujii, Tomoki & Lanjouw, Peter & Ozler, Berk & Yin, Wesley, 2007. "Poverty alleviation through geographic targeting: How much does disaggregation help?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 198-213, May.
    3. José Cuesta, 2007. "On more ambitious conditional cash transfers, social protection and permanent reduction of poverty," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(7), pages 1016-1019.
    4. de Janvry, Alain & Finan, Frederico & Sadoulet, Elisabeth & Vakis, Renos, 2006. "Can conditional cash transfer programs serve as safety nets in keeping children at school and from working when exposed to shocks?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 349-373, April.
    5. Alain de Janvry & Elisabeth Sadoulet, 2005. "Achieving success in rural development: toward implementation of an integral approach," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 32(s1), pages 75-89, January.
    6. Armando Barrientos & David Hulme, 2009. "Social Protection for the Poor and Poorest in Developing Countries: Reflections on a Quiet Revolution," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(4), pages 439-456.
    7. Vinod Thomas & Xubei Luo, 2011. "Overlooked Links in the Results Chain," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2347, January.
    8. Emmanuel Skoufias & David P. Coady, 2007. "Are the Welfare Losses from Imperfect Targeting Important?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(296), pages 756-776, November.
    9. Glewwe, Paul & Kremer, Michael, 2006. "Schools, Teachers, and Education Outcomes in Developing Countries," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    10. Sandra Garcia & Jennifer Hill, 2010. "Impact of conditional cash transfers on children's school achievement: evidence from Colombia," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(1), pages 117-137.
    11. Saavedra, Juan Esteban & Garcia, Sandra, 2012. "Impacts of Conditional Cash Transfer Programs on Educational Outcomes in Developing Countries: A Meta-analysis," Working Papers 921-1, RAND Corporation.
    12. Armando Barrientos & Rachel Sabates-Wheeler, 2011. "Strategic complementarities and social transfers: how do PROGRESA payments impact nonbeneficiaries?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(23), pages 3175-3185.
    13. repec:spr:soinre:v:133:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1355-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Michael Clemens, 2004. "The Long Walk to School: International Education Goals in Historical Perspective," Working Papers 37, Center for Global Development.
    15. repec:taf:jdevst:v:52:y:2016:i:8:p:1087-1098 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Evan Borkum, 2012. "Can Eliminating School Fees in Poor Districts Boost Enrollment? Evidence from South Africa," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 60(2), pages 359-398.
    17. Jérémie Gignoux, 2006. "Évaluations ex ante et ex post d'un programme d'allocations scolaires conditionnées au Mexique," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 174(3), pages 59-85.
    18. Villatoro S., Pablo, 2005. "Programas de transferencias monetarias condicionadas: experiencias en América Latina," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), August.
    19. Finan,Frederico S. & De Janvry,Alain F. & Sadoulet,Elisabeth Marie L. & Vakis,Renos, 2004. "Can conditional cash transfer programs improve social risk management? Lessons for education and child labor outcomes," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 32543, The World Bank.
    20. Barrientos, Armando & Niño-Zarazúa, Miguel, 2011. "Social transfers and chronic poverty: objectives, design, reach and impact," MPRA Paper 30465, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    21. Natàlia Caldés & John A. Maluccio, 2005. "The cost of conditional cash transfers," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(2), pages 151-168.
    22. Armando Barrientos & Jasmina Byrne & Juan Miguel Villa & Paola Peña, 2013. "Social Transfers and Child Protection," Papers inwopa691, Innocenti Working Papers.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iie:ppress:cgd376. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peterson Institute webmaster). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iieeeus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.