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Social Transfers and Child Protection

Author

Listed:
  • Armando Barrientos
  • Jasmina Byrne
  • Juan Miguel Villa
  • Paola Peña

Abstract

The paper assesses the available evidence on the potential effects of social transfers on child protection outcomes in low- and middle-income countries: the negative outcomes or damaging exposure of children to violence, exploitation, abuse and neglect, and improved outcomes or a reduction in exposure to these phenomena. The study identifies and evaluates three possible channels through which social transfers can influence child protection outcomes: direct effects observed where the objectives of social transfers are explicit chid protection outcomes; indirect effects where the impact of social transfers on poverty and exclusion leads to improved child protection outcomes; and potential synergies in implementation of social transfers and child protection. It also discusses how the design and implementation of social transfers can contribute to improved child protection outcomes. A revised version of this report was published in the Children and Youth Services Review

Suggested Citation

  • Armando Barrientos & Jasmina Byrne & Juan Miguel Villa & Paola Peña, 2013. "Social Transfers and Child Protection," Papers inwopa691, Innocenti Working Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa691
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. de Janvry, Alain & Finan, Frederico & Sadoulet, Elisabeth & Vakis, Renos, 2006. "Can conditional cash transfer programs serve as safety nets in keeping children at school and from working when exposed to shocks?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 349-373, April.
    2. Viviane Azevedo & Cesar Bouillon & Ignacio Irarrazaval, 2011. "La efectividad de las redes de protección social: El rol de los sistemas integrados de información social en seis países de América Latina," Research Department Publications 4712, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    3. Victoria Hosegood & Anne Case & Cally Ardington, 2009. "Labor Supply Responses to Large Social Transfers: Longitudinal Evidence from South Africa," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 22-48, January.
    4. Morley, Samuel & David Coady, 2003. "From Social Assistance to Social Development: Targeted Education Subsidies in Developing Countries," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number cgd376.
    5. Jere R. Behrman & Jorge Gallardo-García & Susan W. Parker & Petra E. Todd & Viviana Vélez-Grajales, 2012. "Are conditional cash transfers effective in urban areas? Evidence from Mexico," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 233-259, February.
    6. Barrientos, Armando & Nino-Zarazua, Miguel, 2010. "Social Assistance in Developing Countries Database Version 5.0," MPRA Paper 20001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Barrientos, Armando, 2012. "Social Transfers and Growth: What Do We Know? What Do We Need to Find Out?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 11-20.
    8. Khandker, Shahidur & Pitt, Mark & Fuwa, Nobuhiko, 2003. "Subsidy to Promote Girls' Secondary Education: The Female Stipend Program in Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 23688, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Sam Hickey, 2007. "Conceptualising the Politics of Social Protection in Africa," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 0407, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    10. Szreter, Simon, 2007. "The Right of Registration: Development, Identity Registration, and Social Security--A Historical Perspective," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 67-86, January.
    11. Ariel Fiszbein & Norbert Schady & Francisco H.G. Ferreira & Margaret Grosh & Niall Keleher & Pedro Olinto & Emmanuel Skoufias, 2009. "Conditional Cash Transfers : Reducing Present and Future Poverty," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2597, November.
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    13. Oliver, Azuara, 2009. "Does poverty alleviation increase migration? evidence from Mexico," MPRA Paper 35076, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Armando Barrientos & Jocelyn DeJong, 2006. "Reducing Child Poverty with Cash Transfers: A Sure Thing?," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 24(5), pages 537-552, September.
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    17. Emanuela Galasso, 2011. "Alleviating extreme poverty in Chile: the short term effects of Chile Solidario," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 38(1 Year 20), pages 101-127, June.
    18. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2008.158840_3 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Laura B. Rawlings, 2005. "Evaluating the Impact of Conditional Cash Transfer Programs," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 20(1), pages 29-55.
    20. Shylashri Shankar & Raghav Gaiha & Raghbendra Jha, 2011. "Information, Access and Targeting: The National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme in India," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(1), pages 69-95.
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    22. Marito Garcia & Charity M. T. Moore, 2012. "The Cash Dividend : The Rise of Cash Transfer Programs in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2246, November.
    23. Marco Sanfilippo & Bruno Martorano & Chris De Neubourg, 2012. "The Impact of Social Protection on Children: A review of the literature," Papers inwopa666, Innocenti Working Papers.
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    25. Katia Covarrubias & Benjamin Davis & Paul Winters, 2012. "From protection to production: productive impacts of the Malawi Social Cash Transfer scheme," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(1), pages 50-77, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrea Verdasco, 2013. "Strengthening Child Protection Systems for Unaccompanied Migrant Children in Mozambique: A case study of the border town of Ressano Garcia," Papers inwopa705, Innocenti Working Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    child protection; poverty; rights of the child; social security benefits; transfer income;

    JEL classification:

    • H0 - Public Economics - - General

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