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Heterogeneous Impacts of Conditional Cash Transfers: Evidence from Nicaragua

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  • Dammert, Ana C.

    () (Carleton University)

Abstract

In the last decade, the most popular policy tool used to increase human capital in developing countries has been the conditional cash transfer program. A large literature has shown significant mean impacts on schooling, health, and child labor. This paper examines heterogeneous effects using random-assignment data from the Red de Proteccion Social in rural Nicaragua. Using interactions between the targeting criteria and the treatment indicator, estimates suggest that children located in more impoverished localities experienced a larger impact of the program on schooling in 2001, but this finding is reversed in 2002. Estimated quantile treatment effects indicate that there is considerable heterogeneity in the impacts of the program on the distribution of food expenditures, as well as total expenditures. In particular, households at the lower end of the expenditure distribution experienced a smaller increase in expenditures. This paper also presents evidence of the rank invariance assumption to help clarify the interpretation of the quantile treatment effect in the development literature context.

Suggested Citation

  • Dammert, Ana C., 2008. "Heterogeneous Impacts of Conditional Cash Transfers: Evidence from Nicaragua," IZA Discussion Papers 3653, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3653
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Seth Gitter & James Manley & Brad Barham, 2011. "The Coffee Crisis, Early Childhood Development, and Conditional Cash Transfers," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 3111, Inter-American Development Bank.
    2. Del Carpio, Ximena V. & Loayza, Norman V. & Wada, Tomoko, 2016. "The Impact of Conditional Cash Transfers on the Amount and Type of Child Labor," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 33-47.
    3. Melba V. Tutor, 2014. "The Impact of Philippines’ Conditional Cash Transfer Program on Consumption," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 201405, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
    4. Armando Barrientos & Dario Debowicz & Ingrid Woolard, 2014. "Antipoverty Transfers and Inclusive Growth in Brazil," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series iriba_wp04, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    5. Sosa-Rubí, Sandra G. & Galárraga, Omar & Harris, Jeffrey E., 2009. "Heterogeneous impact of the "Seguro Popular" program on the utilization of obstetrical services in Mexico, 2001-2006: A multinomial probit model with a discrete endogenous variable," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 20-34, January.
    6. De Hoop,Jacobus Joost & Friedman,Jed & Kandpal,Eeshani & Rosati,Furio Camillo, 2017. "Child schooling and child work in the presence of a partial education subsidy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 8182, The World Bank.
    7. Mauricio Moura & Caio Piza & Marcos Poplawski-Ribeiro, 2011. "The Distributive Effects of Land Titleon Labor Supply; Evidence From Brazil," IMF Working Papers 11/131, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Naila Kabeer & Hugh Waddington, 2015. "Economic impacts of conditional cash transfer programmes: a systematic review and meta-analysis," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(3), pages 290-303, September.
    9. Edmonds, Eric V. & Shrestha, Maheshwor, 2014. "You get what you pay for: Schooling incentives and child labor," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 196-211.
    10. Habibov, Nazim N., 2012. "Does childcare have an impact on the quality of parent–child interaction? Evidence from post-Soviet Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(12), pages 2367-2373.
    11. Jacobus de Hoop & Furio C. Rosati, 2014. "Cash Transfers and Child Labor," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 29(2), pages 202-234.
    12. Melba V. Tutor, 2014. "The impact of the PhilippinesÕ conditional cash transfer program on consumption," Philippine Review of Economics, University of the Philippines School of Economics and Philippine Economic Society, vol. 51(1), pages 117-161, June.
    13. Independent Evaluation Group, 2014. "Social Safety Nets and Gender : Learning from Impact Evaluations and World Bank Projects," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 21365.
    14. Djebbari, Habiba & Smith, Jeffrey, 2008. "Heterogeneous impacts in PROGRESA," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 145(1-2), pages 64-80, July.
    15. Saavedra, Juan Esteban & Garcia, Sandra, 2012. "Impacts of Conditional Cash Transfer Programs on Educational Outcomes in Developing Countries: A Meta-analysis," Working Papers 921-1, RAND Corporation.
    16. Sudhanshu Handa & Luisa Natali & David Seidenfeld & Gelson Tembo & Zambia Cash Transfer Evaluation Team & UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2015. "The Impact of Zambia’s Unconditional Child Grant on Schooling and Work: Results from a large-scale social experiment," Papers inwopa776, Innocenti Working Papers.
    17. Del Carpio, Ximena V. & Loayza, Norman V., 2012. "The impact of wealth on the amount and quality of child labor," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5959, The World Bank.
    18. Sørensen, Kenneth Lykke, 2016. "Heterogeneous impacts on earnings from an early effort in labor market programs," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 266-279.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    conditional cash transfers; quantile treatment effect; Nicaragua;

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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