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Do Health Care Providers Respond to Demand-Side Incentives? Evidence from Indonesia

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  • Margaret Triyana

Abstract

This paper exploits the subdistrict randomization of Indonesia's household Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) program to analyze how the program affects the local health care market. The CCT program is associated with increased use of midwives as the main delivery attendants. The program is also associated with a 10 percent increase in both the number of midwives and the delivery fees charged by midwives in treated communities. Program participants report receiving a higher quality of prenatal care. This is due, however, not to improvements in quality of care in the market, but to increased utilization among program participants.

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  • Margaret Triyana, 2016. "Do Health Care Providers Respond to Demand-Side Incentives? Evidence from Indonesia," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 255-288, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aejpol:v:8:y:2016:i:4:p:255-88
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/pol.20140048
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Imelda, Imelda, 2019. "Cooking that Kills : Cleaner Energy, Indoor Air Pollution, and Health," UC3M Working papers. Economics 27982, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    2. von Haaren, Paula & Klonner, Stefan, 2020. "Maternal cash for better child health? The impacts of India’s IGMSY/PMMVY maternity benefit scheme," Working Papers 0689, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    3. Juan‐José Díaz & Victor Saldarriaga, 2019. "Encouraging use of prenatal care through conditional cash transfers: Evidence from JUNTOS in Peru," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(9), pages 1099-1113, September.
    4. Imelda,, 2020. "Cooking that kills: Cleaner energy access, indoor air pollution, and health," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 147(C).

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • I13 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Insurance, Public and Private
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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