IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/aea/aejpol/v4y2012i3p190-215.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Doctor Might See You Now: The Supply Side Effects of Public Health Insurance Expansions

Author

Listed:
  • Craig L. Garthwaite

Abstract

In the United States, public health insurance programs cover over 90 million individuals. Expansions of these programs, such as the recently passed Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), may have large effects on physician behavior. This study finds that following the implementation of the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), physicians decreased the number of hours spent with patients, but increased their program participation. Suggestive evidence shows that this decrease resulted from shorter office visits. These findings are consistent with the predictions from a mixed-economy model of physician behavior and provide evidence of crowd out resulting from the creation of SCHIP. (JEL H75, I11, I13, I18)

Suggested Citation

  • Craig L. Garthwaite, 2012. "The Doctor Might See You Now: The Supply Side Effects of Public Health Insurance Expansions," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 4(3), pages 190-215, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aejpol:v:4:y:2012:i:3:p:190-215
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/pol.4.3.190
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/pol.4.3.190
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/aej/pol/data/2010-0242_data.zip
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to AEA members and institutional subscribers.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Stange, Kevin, 2014. "How does provider supply and regulation influence health care markets? Evidence from nurse practitioners and physician assistants," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 1-27.
    2. Courtemanche, Charles & Friedson, Andrew I. & Koller, Andrew P. & Rees, Daniel I., 2017. "The Affordable Care Act and Ambulance Response Times," IZA Discussion Papers 10951, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Johanna Catherine Maclean & Ioana Popovici & Elisheva Stern, 2015. "Health Insurance Expansions and Provider Behavior: Evidence from Substance Use Disorder Providers," DETU Working Papers 1510, Department of Economics, Temple University.
    4. Margaret Triyana, 2016. "Do Health Care Providers Respond to Demand-Side Incentives? Evidence from Indonesia," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 255-288, November.
    5. Freedman, Seth & Lin, Haizhen & Simon, Kosali, 2015. "Public health insurance expansions and hospital technology adoption," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 117-131.
    6. Michael D. Frakes & Matthew B. Frank & Seth A. Seabury, 2017. "The Effect of Malpractice Law on Physician Supply: Evidence from Negligence-Standard Reforms," NBER Working Papers 23446, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Thomas C. Buchmueller & Sarah Miller & Marko Vujicic, 2014. "How Do Providers Respond to Public Health Insurance Expansions? Evidence from Adult Medicaid Dental Benefits," NBER Working Papers 20053, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Thomas Buchmueller & John C. Ham & Lara D. Shore-Sheppard, 2015. "The Medicaid Program," NBER Chapters,in: Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, volume 1, pages 21-136 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Wagner, Kathryn L., 2016. "Shock, but no shift: Hospitals' responses to changes in patient insurance mix," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 46-58.
    10. Bronchetti, Erin Todd, 2014. "Public insurance expansions and the health of immigrant and native children," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 205-219.
    11. Thomas Buchmueller & Sarah Miller & Marko Vujicic, 2016. "How Do Providers Respond to Changes in Public Health Insurance Coverage? Evidence from Adult Medicaid Dental Benefits," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 70-102, November.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I13 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Insurance, Public and Private
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

    Lists

    This item is featured on the following reading lists or Wikipedia pages:
    1. The Doctor Might See You Now: The Supply Side Effects of Public Health Insurance Expansions (AEJ:EP 2012) in ReplicationWiki

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aea:aejpol:v:4:y:2012:i:3:p:190-215. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jane Voros) or (Michael P. Albert). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aeaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.