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Experimentation at Scale

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  • Karthik Muralidharan
  • Paul Niehaus

Abstract

This paper makes the case for greater use of randomized experiments “at scale.” We review various critiques of experimental program evaluation in developing countries, and discuss how experimenting at scale along three specific dimensions – the size of the sampling frame, the number of units treated, and the size of the unit of randomization – can help alleviate them. We find that program evaluation randomized controlled trials published in top journals over the last 15 years have typically been “small” in these senses, but also identify a number of examples – including from our own work – demonstrating that experimentation at much larger scales is both feasible and valuable.

Suggested Citation

  • Karthik Muralidharan & Paul Niehaus, 2017. "Experimentation at Scale," NBER Working Papers 23957, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23957
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    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • O20 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - General

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