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The Impact of Increasing Food Supply on Human Nutrition: Implications for Commodity Priorities in Agricultural Research and Policy

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  • Per Pinstrup-Andersen
  • Norha Ruiz de Londoño
  • Edward Hoover

Abstract

A procedure is developed to estimate the nutritional implications of alternative commodity priorities in agricultural research and policy. The model estimates the distribution of supply increases among consumer groups, the related adjustments in total food consumption, and implications for calorie and protein nutrition. Findings from an empirical application of the model to the population of Cali, Colombia, suggest that relative increase in total nutrient supply is a poor indicator of relative nutritional impact because both nutritional waste and consumer adjustment in total food consumption are a function of the commodity from which the additional nutrients are obtained.

Suggested Citation

  • Per Pinstrup-Andersen & Norha Ruiz de Londoño & Edward Hoover, 1976. "The Impact of Increasing Food Supply on Human Nutrition: Implications for Commodity Priorities in Agricultural Research and Policy," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 58(2), pages 133-142.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:58:y:1976:i:2:p:133-142.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/ajae/58.2.133
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Prabhu Pingali, 2007. "Agricultural growth and economic development: a view through the globalization lens," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 37(s1), pages 1-12, December.
    2. Barrett, Christopher B., 1999. "The microeconomics of the developmental paradox: on the political economy of food price policy," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 20(2), pages 159-172, March.
    3. Scobie, Grant M., 1984. "Investment in Agricultural Research: Some Economic Principles," Economics Working Papers 232447, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
    4. Ogunlesi, Ayodeji & Bokana, Koye & Okoye, Chidozie & Loy, Jens-Peter, 2018. "Agricultural Productivity and Food Supply Stability in Sub-Saharan Africa: LSDV and SYS-GMM Approach," MPRA Paper 90204, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Barrett, Christopher B., 1996. "On price risk and the inverse farm size-productivity relationship," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 193-215, December.
    6. Harold Alderman, 1990. "Pobreza y Desnutrición, ¿Cuán Estrecha es la Relación?," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 27(81), pages 151-166.
    7. Bouis, Howarth E., 1996. "A food demand system based on demand for characteristics: If there is 'curvature' in the Slutsky matrix, what do the curves look like and why?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 239-266, December.
    8. Pinstrup-Andersen, Per, 1981. "Ex Ante Assessment of Consumption and Nutrition Effects of Agricultural Research," Evaluation of Agricultural Research, Proceedings of a Workshop, Minneapolis, MN, May 12-13, 1980, Miscellaneous Publication 8 49059, University of Minnesota, Agricultural Experiment Station.
    9. Andersen-Pinstrup, Per, 2013. "Contemporary food policy challenges and opportunities," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 58(4), October.
    10. Manrique, Justo & Jensen, Helen, 1993. "Disaggregated welfare effects of agricultural price policies in urban Indonesia," UC3M Working papers. Economics 2902, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    11. A. C. Herruzo, 1992. "Producer Benefits From Technology Induced Supply Shifts In The Ec Cotton Regime," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(1), pages 56-63, January.
    12. Senauer, Benjamin, 1989. "Recent Evidence Concerning Household Behavior And Nutrition In Developing Countries," Staff Papers 14261, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    13. Paul Winters & Alain De Janvry & Elisabeth Sadoulet & Kostas Stamoulis, 1998. "The role of agriculture in economic development: Visible and invisible surplus transfers," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(5), pages 71-97.
    14. Per Pinstrup‐Andersen, 2007. "Agricultural research and policy for better health and nutrition in developing countries: a food systems approach," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 37(s1), pages 187-198, December.
    15. Kumar, Praduman & Kumar, Anjani & Parappurathu, Shinoj & Raju, S.S., 2011. "Estimation of Demand Elasticity for Food Commodities in India," Agricultural Economics Research Review, Agricultural Economics Research Association (India), vol. 24(1), June.
    16. Arega D. Alene & V. M. Manyong & Eric F. Tollens & Steffen Abele, 2009. "Efficiency–equity tradeoffs and the scope for resource reallocation in agricultural research: evidence from Nigeria," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(1), pages 1-14, January.
    17. Suresh Chandra Babu & Meera Singh & T. V. Hymavathi & K. Uma Rani & G. G. Kavitha & Shree Karthik, 2016. "Improved Nutrition through Agricultural Extension and Advisory Services," World Bank Other Operational Studies 23767, The World Bank.

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