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Child Health and Economic Crisis in Peru

  • Christina Paxson
  • Norbert Schady

The effect of macroeconomic crises on child health is a topic of great policy importance. This article analyzes the impact of a profound crisis in Peru on infant mortality. It finds an increase of about 2.5 percentage points in the infant mortality rate for children born during the crisis of the late 1980s, which implies that about 17,000 more children died than would have in the absence of the crisis. Accounting for the precise source of the increase in infant mortality is difficult, but it appears that the collapse in public and private expenditures on health played an important role. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

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Article provided by World Bank Group in its journal The World Bank Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 19 (2005)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 203-223

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Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:19:y:2005:i:2:p:203-223
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  1. Takashi Yamano & Harold Alderman & Luc Christiaensen, 2003. "Child growth, shocks, and food aid in rural Ethiopia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3128, The World Bank.
  2. Glewwe, Paul & Hall, Gillette, 1994. "Poverty, Inequality, and Living Standards during Unorthodox Adjustment: The Case of Peru, 1985-1990," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 42(4), pages 689-717, July.
  3. Brainerd, Elizabeth, 1998. "Market reform and mortality in transition economies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(11), pages 2013-2027, November.
  4. Robert Jensen, 2000. "Agricultural Volatility and Investments in Children," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 399-404, May.
  5. Christopher J. Ruhm, 1996. "Are Recessions Good For Your Health?," NBER Working Papers 5570, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Kenneth Y. Chay & Michael Greenstone, 1999. "The Impact of Air Pollution on Infant Mortality: Evidence from Geographic Variation in Pollution Shocks Induced by a Recession," NBER Working Papers 7442, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Cameron, Lisa A., 2002. "The impact of the Indonesian financial crisis on children : data from 100 villages survey," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2799, The World Bank.
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