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Do Cash Transfers Promote Food Security? The Case of the South African Child Support Grant

Author

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  • d'Agostino, Giorgio
  • Scarlato, Margherita
  • Napolitano, Silvia

Abstract

This paper evaluates the causal effect of the Child Support Grant (CSG) implemented in South Africa on household food consumption and dietary diversity. The analysis uses the National Income Dynamics Study (NIDS) covering 2008, 2010-2011 and 2012, and carries out a regression discontinuity design exploiting the increase in the age limit criteria for eligibility for the program. Our results show that the CSG have proved to be effective in increasing total food expenditure per adult equivalent but has not significantly changed the dietary habits of the beneficiary households, nor has the program resulted in any stronger effect for the most vulnerable subgroups of the beneficiary population. To analyse the external and internal validities of the results, a comparison between non-parametric, semi-parametric and parametric estimates is presented.

Suggested Citation

  • d'Agostino, Giorgio & Scarlato, Margherita & Napolitano, Silvia, 2016. "Do Cash Transfers Promote Food Security? The Case of the South African Child Support Grant," MPRA Paper 69177, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:69177
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. von Fintel, Dieter & Pienaar, Louw, 2016. "Small-Scale Farming and Food Security: The Enabling Role of Cash Transfers in South Africa's Former Homelands," IZA Discussion Papers 10377, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. repec:bec:imsber:v:11:y:2019:i:1:p:55-82 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:spr:ssefpa:v:10:y:2018:i:6:d:10.1007_s12571-018-0862-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Giorgio d'Agostino & Margherita Scarlato, 2019. "Cash transfers, labor supply and gender inequality: Evidence from South Africa," Working Papers 0046, ASTRIL - Associazione Studi e Ricerche Interdisciplinari sul Lavoro.
    5. d'Agostino, Giorgio & Scarlato, Margherita, 2016. "Gender Inequality in the South African Labour Market: the Impact of the Child Support Grant," MPRA Paper 72523, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Food security; Cash transfers; Regression discontinuity design; South Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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